Skip to main content

Full text of "Mother's nursery songs"

See other formats


FROM THE LIBRARY OF 
REV. LOUIS FITZGERALD BENSON, D. D. 

BEQUEATHED BY HIM TO 

THE LIBRARY OF 

PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



DMaiorf 

I 
Section 



5/£3 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Princeton Theological Seminary Library 



http://archive.org/details/motherOOhast 



THE 



MOTHER'S 



. JUL 20 1934 



NURSERY SONGS. 



BY THOMAS HASTINGS. 



A NEW EDITION REVISED AND ENLARGED. 



NEW YORK : 
PUBLISHED BY M. W. DODD, 

BRICK CHURCH CHAPEL, OPPOSITE CITY HALL. 
1848. 



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1848, 

BY M. W. DODD, 

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the 

Southern District of New York. 



THOMAS B. SMITH, 

MUSIC TYPOGRAPHER & STEREOTYPER, 

216 WILLIAM STREET, N. Y. 



PREFACE. 



The author of the following pages was one day conversing with a lady 
of some distinction, relative to the importance of teaching young children 
to sing, when a question arose — whether anything could be done by the 
mother in this respect, during the period of the early infancy of her off- 
spring ? This inquiry, with the discussion that ensued, gave rise to the 
present publication. 

Great originality will hardly be expected in such a work as this : yet 
many of the materials here presented have not elsewhere appeared. A 
few extracts have been furnished from the writings of Jane Taylor. And 
for several of the other little poems, the author is happy to acknowledge 
his obligations to literary friends, among whom are the Rev. James 
Alexander, D.D., of this city, Mrs. Sigourney, of Hartford, Connecticut, 
and Mrs. Brown, of Munson, Massachusetts. 

The object of the work, as will be readily inferred from its special 
characteristics, is to aid mothers in attuning the voices of their infant off- 
spring, and inspiring them with the love of vocal music. 



INTRODUCTION. 



The fact that so large a portion of the present generation are unable to sing, is not 
to be attributed to physical deficiences, but to unfortunate circumstances in the history 
of early education. In countries where music is continually taught in the primary 
schools, the children, as a matter of course, all learn to sing : and the same experiment, 
wherever it has been tried in our own country, has led to the same happy results. 
This circumstance alone shows the importance of early cultivation. If music is neg- 
lected till years of maturity, it will, in the majority of instances, continue to be disre- 
garded through life. Infancy is undoubtedly the most favorable period for commencing 
the work. The foundation must be laid then if distinguished excellence is ever after- 
wards to be attained. 

Adults, with voices of the most unpromising character imaginable, have sometimes, 
it is true, been taught to sing. The thing in its nature is not impracticable, but it is 
very difficult. It requires time and labor and perseverance, such as few, comparatively, 
are found to possess. But with young children the task is neither difficult nor labo- 
rious. The principle chiefly employed in forming the voice is imitation. The child, un- 
der favorable circumstances, acquires the management of its voice in song, just as it ac- 
quires it in speech. In both cases it is the imitative pupil of its mother or nurse. Mothers 
should think of this, and not neglect to stir up the musical gift that is within them- 
selves. Though that gift should be small, it might at least suffice to initiate the lis- 
tening ones in the practice of an important art which would afterwards be more suc- 
cessfully prosecuted. 

One who wishes to acquire practical skill as a player on a musical instrument, must 
of necessity begin by drawing forth such tones or executing such passages, as can be 
mastered with the greatest facility ; deferring such as are more difficult to a later period 
of cultivation. For all the purposes of vocal training, the mother may regard her in- 
fant child as such an instrument, not doubting but perseverance will accomplish the 
desired object. 

There is a special season in infancy when children are full of mimicry. Then, a 
great portion of their daily employment, while in perfect health, is like that of the 



INTRODUCTION. v 

mocking-bird, to be imitating every pleasant sound that falls within their hearing. 
Their earliest efforts in this respect will necessarily be rude, but, by constant practice, 
their talent is found to improve; while, at the same time they acquire an increasing 
fondness for the exercise. Does not nature evidently point out this period as the pre- 
cise time for making musical impressions upon the child that will be strong and indeli- 

Let no one suppose that the voice is necessarily injured by early cultivation. If the 
little one is not induced to sing too much or too loud for its general health, there will 
be nothing to fear. Its voice will improve much in proportion to its practice ; and 
when, in subsequent years, it becomes for a little period broken and discordant, it will in 
due time be easily restored. Every child, sooner or later, must pass through such a change, 
as the unavoidable result of physical changes in the structure or conformation of its 
organs. Daily, moderate practice will be the obvious and certain remedy. 

Previous to the period of infantile mimicry above mentioned, the affectionate mother 
will often have been soothing her child with the voice of song. When that period 
arrives, let her continue the practice in melodies as simple as those in Part First of 
this work. And as the child begins in the smallest degree to play the mimic, let her 
in turn become the imitator, so far as to seize upon every note which has resemblance 
to music, and thus encourage the child to repeat its efforts. The mother may thus 
gradually draw out and form its voice for music, just as she teaches it the articulations 
of the native tongue. The latter process she well understands. She begins with the 
simplest syllables only, and as she proceeds with those that are more difficult, the 
exercise is carefully adapted to the gradual progress of the child. Nothing is forced. 
Every thing is made pleasant and amusing to the little pupil : and the mother at every 
step is so amply rewarded for her assiduity, as to feel that her labor is but another 
name for delightful recreation. 

The same course in reference to singing would be rewarded with the same success. 
Though the mother should be quite ignorant of the simplest principles of the science, 
her skill in minstrelsy would suffice for the work immediately before her. Let her 
also frame some simple clauses of melody, that are very similar to those she notices in 
the mimicry of her child, gradually heightening their character as the child improves 
its vocal powers. All these exercises perhaps will be inarticulate ; and in some cases 
the child will make more rapid progress in song than in speech. 

Of all the articulations that fall from the unpractised lips of infancy, the first and 
perhaps the sweetest that ever greet the maternal ear, are those of ba, pa, na, ma, ta, 
da, followed afterwards by their compounds papa, mama, &c. The mother should not 
fail to set them to music in some such clauses as these that follow : 

_j #i j *i zzj -^_;_^L r r i f * r—f—r- 

ba, ba, ba, ba, pa, pa, pa, pa, na, na, na, na, ta, ta, da, da. 



vi INTRODUCTION. 

A considerable portion of time, it is true, may elapse, before such clauses as these will 
be fully understood ; and the child perhaps will incline to substitute other clauses in 
their place, and thus become its own composer. The only important point here, is to 
see that its tones are rendered musical. 

In process of time let the musical passages be augmented somewhat after the fol- 
lowing method, observing to sing them in a guttural and not in a nasal manner : 

T—r— f—r— r-t— ?— r r f f r t r f r f r 

pa mama, pa mama, da na na, da na na, mama, papa, dada. 

^^£ r=f = ^ r^^ 

father dear, mother dear, brother dear. 

The process from such passages as these, to such as constitute the first and second 
lullabys of this collection will be easy ; and thenceforward less skill in adaptation will 
be required. 

The preceding directions may suffice for the object before us ; if followed with per- 
severance the child will begin to sing long before it is old enough to understand the 
rules of the art ; and this, much to its own amusement and to the gratification of its 
affectionate parents. Some may doubt the practicability of the course here recom- 
mended ; but certainly it is an easy one. Let them be persuaded to try it faithfully 
and perseveringly, and the author will consent to be responsible for their success. 



INDEX. 



Adoption, 91 

Ah, why will my dear, 43 

And now the day is ending, 80 

Awake, awake, my love, 79 

Baby is crying, 47 

Baby is sick, 48 

Baron 94 

Be hush'd, 25 

Brown, .... 57 

By the side of a river, 72 

Cherries are ripe, 45 

Creation, 55 

Dark night away, 77 

Dawn of day, 36 

Fragile blossom, 71 

Free from slumber, 33 

Good little girls, 60 

Happy child, 81 

Hark, the bell, 46 

Hosanna, 92 

How gentle, 95 



How I love my tender mother, bl 

Hushaby, 21 

I'm not too young, 86 

I saw an old cottage, 63 

Learning to sing, 66 

Let children young, 89 

Little brother, 35 

Little Jack, 39 

Lord's prayer, 83 

Lucerne, 90 

Lullaby, 19 

Middletown, 93 

Now I lay me down, 75 

O dear one, 26 

O do not wake. 24 

Oh, don't hurt the dog, 53 

O my precious little gem, 27 

O what a naughty dog, 51 

O wild is thy joy, 38 

Safe sleeping, 28 

See the naughty kitten, 50 



INDEX. 



Self-consecration, 84 

Sleep, baby, sleep, 20 

Sleep, O sleep, 30 

Slumber sweet, 22 

Softly in the cradle, 23 

Tender Shepherd, 87 

The appeal, 49 

The ark and dove, 56 

The bees, 62 

The chatterbox, 64 

The commandments, 59 

The field, 40 

The heathen mother, 70 

The humming-bird, '. 42 

The lilies, 85 

The little bird, 41 

The little lamb, 67 

The merry lark, 31 

The moon is very fair, 58 



The morning, 88 

The orphan, 68 

The penitent child, 69 

The robin, r 44 

The scale, 65 

The shadow, 34 

The storm, 82 

The sun hath gone to rest, 76 

The tempest, 78 

Time to arise, 37 

To infant school, 52 

Toll the bell, 54 

Up in the morning, 32 

Voice of spring, 74 

Weep not, 29 

Welcome, welcome, 96 



RUDIMENTS OF NOTATION. 



A few hints on the subject of Notation may, to great advantage, be early com- 
municated to the juvenile mind, in connection with the simplest practical exercises. 



THE OCTAVE WITH FRAGMENTARY PORTIONS, &c. 

First. Let the pupils be taught to sing orally the steps or intervals of the ascending 
and descending octave : 

Ascending — Do, re, mi, faw, sol, la, si, do. 
Descending — Do, si, la, sol, faw, mi, re, do. 

Second. Let fragments of the octave ascending and descending, be reduced to practice 
in the same manner :* 

Ascending. Descending. 

do, re— re, do. 

do, re, mi — mi, re, do. 

do, re, mi, faw — faw, mi, re, do. 

do, re, mi, faw, sol — sol, faw, mi, re, do. 

do, re, mi, faw, sol, la — la, sol, faw, mi, re, do. 

Descending. Ascending. 

do, si — si, do. 

do, si, la — la, si, do. 

do, si, la, sol — sol, la, si, do. 

do, si, la, sol, faw — faw, sol, la, si, do. 

do, si, la, sol, faw, mi — mi, faw, sol, la, si, do. 

* In some cases when the voice is imperfectly developed, it will be better to commence at first 
with the fragments. 



RUDIMENTS OF NOTATION. 



Third. When the pupils are thus made familiar with the sounds and syllables, 
they will be easily taught to sing them upon the staff. 



THE OCTAVE. 



3E 



3 



^^m 



! — r 

=3 o < * 



Do re mi fa sol la si do 



Do si la sol fa mi re do 



FRAGMENTS. 



SE 



3 



^=F 



Do re re do &c. 



= a a 



-s-^r-^r-s?- 



^2_d- 



~^^^~ 



^±3^3= 



~^B- s " 



=^= 



"FTT ^l 1 ! I i i ! 1 f 



=5 



fee^ 



^=^ 



^-f~rr 



Do si &c. 



3£E£ 



S=E 



S 



^ 



As the octave is movable, we might with equal propriety have commenced these 
exercises on some other place in the staff, while the reading, comparatively speaking, 
would have been the same ; i. c, re would have been found one degree above do, and 
mi one degree above re, &c. 

Fourth. The intervals thus far in the exercises have been gradual ; but we have in 
the next place to deal with skips. This is done orally, by sounding the intermediate 
degrees lightly, and afterwards omitting them ; thus, — 
do, re, mi — do — Mr. 
do, re, mi, faw— do — faw. 
do, re, mi, faw, sol — do— sol, &c. 
or the thing may be accomplished in connection with written characters ; the small 
notes at first to be sung, and afterwards omitted ; thus, — 



RUDIMENTS OF NOTATION. 

SKIPS MEASURED BY DEGREES. 



-^n*- 


-o- 


1 
-eJ- 


— 1- 


i 


-&- 


1 





-e- 


i 


S- 


i 
— I 

CD 




-€3>- 


i 


-c- 


e 


i 



3EgE 



o f ? v 



-<=- ^- 













o o p 




o pa 




s n 










i P 


1 1 ' ! 




i 


i 1 P P P 


I 



g o r> 



3Z-2: 



E ^^ 



-o — i — <=*- 



e 



i^A. The preceding clauses, when musically arranged, will form distinct melo- 
dies, which may now be easily read : 

1. Do you to oth - ers as you would That they should do to you ; 



w^ 



^ 



- o P 



-^ — a — ^ ~ 



~S S5~ 

£)<? ^ rfo re re &c. 
What- e'er is hon - est, just and good, With all your might pur - sue. 



^ 



_ p p p 



-p— P — g =s: 



^ 



I ! I 



2. Let us raise the in - fant cho - rus To our Fa - ther in the skies ; 



-& el- 



~o g g © ef- 



3 



3 



3/i mi &c, 



rii RUDIMENTS OF NOTATION. 

Who so kind - ly watches o'er us And our ev - ery want sup - plies. 



^m 



a 



w 



Sixth. The pupils may also learn to number the intervals ; thus, do, is one ; re, is 
two, &c. Or to count them upon the staff, as in the second of the above melodies, 
which commences, 3355655 3, &c. 



II. 
NOTES AND RESTS. 

Of notes as marks of sound and of rests as marks of silence, there are six kinds in 
common use, consisting of open and closed heads, and hooks and stems, which the pu- 
pils may readily learn to describe. 

Whole. Half. Quarter. Eighth. Sixteenth. Thirty-second. 

Notes. f f [ £ g 



Rests. -~- f 1 ^ 5 

1 i 

The whole note is an open head ; the half-note is an open head with a stem, &c. 
The whole rest is a square closed head below the line ; the half-rest is a square closed 
head above the line, &c. 

Practical Lessons. 

1st. Apply two beats to each whole note, one to each half-note; while two quarter 
notes are taken to a beat. 



Down, down, 
up. up. &c. d, u, 


I 




d rz P ° P 


— — e? eJ ° ° 


_<=>. h3- O O ° ° 



1,2, 1,2, 



RUDIMENTS OF NOTATION. 

down, up. 



X1U 





[ 1 


1 


III J - 1 «3 - 


<3 H J 1 ! 


III' M d + 


o ri ' 1 


1 1 1 1 J -J • •» * * 


1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1,2, 1,2, 


CP - 


-p— -— m J ■ _J — i 1 1_ — 1 — 1 — 1 — 1 : 




U| p 


^ s— ^^-^^^-^" d-5^5-^ ' 



1,2, 1,2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 

2d. Exercises of a simpler kind may easily be framed by the teacher, if these are 
too difficult. Beating also should occasionally be performed by audible counting, 
instead of singing, thus : 





down, 
1, 


t 


a, 
i, 


2, 


1, 


2, 


1. 


u, &c. 
2. 




down, 

1, 


left, 
2, 


up, 
3, 




down, 
1, 


left, 
2, 




up, &c. 
3. 


down, 
1, 


left, 

2, 


right, 
3, 


up, 
4, 




down, 
1, 


left, 
2, 




right, up, &c. 
3, 4. 



The following melodies after a little preparatory practice may be sung with beating ; 
the down beat always having the accent. 



=^=*= 



3=3= 



*-d-±-d 



-*-+ 



w _ 
u, d, u 



d, Uj d, u, d, u, d, u, d, u, d, u, d 

1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1,2,3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1,2,3 



± 



3 



^^-j 



Bz 



1, u, d, 1, u, d, 1, u. 



Down, left, up, d, 1, u, d, 1, u, d, 1, u, d, 1, u, 



More extended exercises and perhaps some which are still simpler may be found in 
the current manuals of instruction. Almost every thing in the case of children will 
depend on the amount of well-directed practice. 



RUDIMENTS OF NOTATION. 



III. 

OF THE TRANSPOSITIONS OF THE SCALE. 

On the subject of transpositions our limits compel us to be very brief. Five lines 
with their spaces form a staff; the degrees of which are named from the first seven 
letters of the alphabet. That staff which is used for the highest voices, is furnished 

with this character 3£ called the G clef. The staff which is used for bass is supplied 

with the F clef (|p. 

The treble staff is thus named : 



-C- 



_ E _ 



-= G- 



■-= B— 



__ d_ 



__ F - 



-A- 



When no special indications are given to the contrary, the octave commences upon 
C of this staff, precisely as in the foregoing exercises. The indications of removal are 

JlatSj sharps and naturals. 

Flat. Sharp. Natural. 

b # § 

Of the order of these indications it may be sufficient to say, that the flat is inserted 
on the place where faw as a governing note is transposed ; and that the sharp performs 
a similar office with respect to the syllable si ; while the natural is occasionally used to 
mark the discontinuance of some such indication. 



EXAMPLES BY FLATS. 



^ 



=fc=£> 



* 



Do re mi 



I 



faw mi re do 



faw mi re do 



-&— p- 



faw 



do 



faw 



do 



RUDIMENTS OF NOTATION. 



EXAMPLES BY SHARPS. 



i 



#— P 



^ 



T=F~^ 



=«=^ 



# 



=S=K 



TT 



la sol faw mi re do 



si la sol faw mi re 



fe^ 



-r-*-p-g= 



-p-p- 



-p-g-a- 



si la sol faw mi re do 



si la sol faw mi re do 



From these examples it appears that when there is more than one flat or sharp at 
the clef, the last one governs the syllables ; and it is needful only for the children to 
say that the flat or the last flat governs faio; while the sharp or the last sharp governs 
si. The order of insertion is always the same, — that is, the first flat always occurs on 
B, the second flat on E, &c, as above seen. Flats and sharps thus used at the clefs 
are called the signature. The following table may conveniently be committed to 
memory : 



In the signature of 1 Flat, Do is in F. 
" « " 2 Flats, do " Bb 
" " " 3 Flats, do " Eb 
» « " 4 Flats, do " Ab 



In the signature of 1 Sharp, Do is in G. 
" " " 2 Sharps, do " D. 
" " " 3 Sharps, do " A. 
" " " 4 Sharps, do " E. 



The following melodies will now be easily read, by ascertaining the appropriate syl- 
lables, the power of which, relatively speaking, is always the same. 



Beats. 1, 2, 1, 



TWILIGHT. Do on the first line. 
2, &c. 



It 



i=§^^ 



=S^ 



±3c 



Now from la - bor and from care Ev'ning hours have set me free, 
In the work of praise and prayer Lord, I would converse with thee ; 

1, 2, 1, 2, &c. 



^ = f-r-^ 



S£ 



=+= 



be-hold me from a - bove, Fill me with the Saviour's love. 
* The repeat requires a simple repetition of the preceding music. 



RUDIMENTS OF NOTATION. 
THE PILGRIMAGE. 



C\ J± # i 






V *1L ' 


1 


A # j « 


P r • <r ' m 


1 


nn • * r 


i i r # ^ « P 


1 


^T J * 4 l 


i i ' • 


1 


Children of the heavenly 


1 i 1 
King, As ye journey sweetly sing ; 


! 


1 


a tt i 1 a £2 


r • * i 


I 


r J • r 


* • - a 


1 


— 5 — J 1 — 1 — 


1 


5 



Sing your Saviour's worthy praise, Glorious in his works and ways. 

.When flats, sharps or naturals occur in the midst of a movement, they are termed 
accidentals. At the clef they form what is termed the signature. Flats depress a note 
the value of half a tone ; sharps require a similar elevation. It is well to change the 
orthography of the syllables' in such cases. When a note is to be depressed, let it be 
so altered as to rhyme with the syllable lay ; thus do will become day, law vtiW become 
lay, &c. When a note is to be elevated, let the syllable be made to rhyme with mi ; 
thus j "aw will become^, sol will become si, &c. Naturals in this connection sometimes 
require the one and sometimes the other alteration, according as they require an eleva- 
tion or depression of the note. 



IV. 

TIME IN REGARD TO MEASURE. 

Tunes are variously divided by the single bar into small equal portions called meas- 
ures. 



Bar. Measure. Bar. Measure. Bar. Measure. Bar. Measure. Bar. 



The time of the measures is indicated by two large figures placed, the one over the 
other, at the clef. The upper figure gives the number of beats in a measure, while 
the under one shows what kind of note ; whether a half-note, a quarter or an eighth 
note is taken at a beat. 



RUDIMENTS OF NOTATION. 



xvu 



Beats in a measure. 3P JJ 5 •*? -If -*¥ -fif 7? 

What kind of note to a beat. 5^4S4*8"'5t7 

In this example the 4, the 2, and the 3 in the upper row, indicate uniformly the 
same corresponding number of beats ; though the 6's when the movement is quick 
sometimes employ but two beats, counting 1, 2, 3, at each motion ; thus : 

down. up. 

1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3. 

The 2 and the 4 and the 8 in the under row. signify a half-note, a quarter-note and 
eighth-note to a beat. The principal accent falls upon the first note of a measure, which 
uniformly employs the down beat. 



1 



d, r, 1, 



EXERCISES. No. 1. Do on F. 



J J i 



g£=-k 



1, 2, 3, 4, 1, % 3,4, 1, % 3, 4, 1 ; 2, 3,4. 
No. 2. Do on G. 



m 



m 



1, 2, 3, 1,2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1,2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 



S 



E& 



£ 



1,2, 3, 



1, 2, 3, 



1, 2. 



xviii 



RUDIMENTS OF NOTATION. 



REMAINING CHARACTERS. 

The remaining characters may be best described to the juvenile mind, as they sev- 
erally occur in practice. We shall therefore merely name them in the present con- 
nection. They are the Brace, the Double-bar, the Repeat, the Close, the Pause, the 
Figure Three, the Dot of Addition, Choosing Notes, Marks of Distinction, Slur, Cres- 
cendo, Diminuendo, Swell, Appogglatures, and After-notes. 



VI. 
MAJOR AND MINOR SCALES. 

Scales have reference chiefly to the distinction between tones and semitones. The 
semitones occur between the syllables mi and faw ; and si and do. The octave hitherto 
commencing with do, has been exclusively in the scale which is called major. When 
it commences with la, as in the following example, the scale is said to be minor ; but 
the syllables still have their accustomed power. 



OCTAVE IN THE MINOR SCALE. 



£ 



£ 



:g£ 



3tp^5 



~32=gZ 



1 



si do re mi fi 



la la sol faw mi re do si la 



We need not enlarge on the subject of the rudiments. More has already been pre- 
sented, we presume, than will generally be needed. A few hints well reduced to prac- 
tice, however, may be of incalculable benefit to the juvenile mind. 



IPAIB^ IF II IRS ft o 



THE CRADLE. 

As the songs under this head will be employed by the mother, chiefly in soothing 
; her infant to sleep, or in mitigating its sufferings in hours of sickness or distress, it 
? seems not necessary that all the language should be adapted to the infantile capacity. 
' It may suffice that the words contain certain easy syllables or phrases, which, by their 
> perpetual recurrence, make strong impressions upon the ear of the child. The exer- 
cise of singing should, however, be so managed as to afford pleasure to the child : for 
otherwise its taste will be injured. 



LULLABY. 

First Treble. 



5hN : ^ 




—t*-> 1 




f\ ^ e m ■ 


e r 


' e & i fi . - 


m -a ' r 


nn \ ■ 




* & r 




\sl 4- 






• #* 


Lullaby, 

Second Treble. 
it 


V S w w i 
lullaby. Do not wake and weep ; 


Softly in the 


y " IS ^ 


K ^ 


Ht X ' " 




s p* 


/ -^ m 


1 Q 


: V | X 1 


! 


' • 9 


f(\ /\ M m m 




J I i 




a a r r 


^ 4 * * 




# & 




> *» 



$HH- ^ 


i — i — i 




m— 


#— 1 


1 — 1 

— 1 — #-^ 


1_ 




A p f 1 


J r 


-^— *. 


—+ f ; ; 


— # — # 


» 




4 


w 






i ' V ^ 


i 








cradle lie, Sleep. sleep : 


Softly in the cradle lie, Sleep, sleep. 


Q * i^ > 


i ■ 


| 


h h | IS. IS 


i 1 EI 


fiH^rr 


-4-4- 


! [— 




iz+dtsLttt 


S 2 — - 


r 


^ _ 


*> • 


1 


# r 







20 



NURSERY SONGS. 



SLEEP, BABY, SLEEP. 

First Treble. 



Q * » o * aq 




* • 




* * 


/ # ^ • r 


P H 


m 


i* r 


p * 1 


nn ^1 r L- <- 


r ! 


r 




r ' 


r * + \ 


Ufi 4 1 ^ ^ 


i 




i 


k k ' 


Sleep, ba - by, sleep, 
Second Treble. 


No 


longer weep ; 


Near thee sits thy 


V ^IL o 








i* i* i 


A # ^ I* (• 


1 r 


P p 


r* 


< i p p 1 


nn 4 ' r i 


# i 


# 


' 


o m I 


^ ^ l* Ik 




i k — k— 




k k-L 



±*z 



s 



EE 



££ 



:E 



v » 



-¥ — V- 



JL * 



V— ¥- 



> r—r -— r— jr 

little brother, Close beside thee is thy mother, Sleep, baby, sleep. 



**z 



B ^P 



£§E? 



I 



:» «_ 



#. » 



-k — Ik- 



Sleep, baby, sleep, 

No longer weep ; 
Near thee sits thy little brother, 
Close beside thee is thy mother, 

Sleep, baby, sleep. 

Sleep, baby, sleep, 

No longer weep ; 
Israel's Shepherd watches o'er thee ; 
No rude danger lies before thee, 

Sleep, baby, sleep. 

Sleep, baby, sleep, 

No longer weep ; 
Germ of beauty, bud and blossom, 
Rest upon thy Saviour's bosom, 

Sleep, baby, sleep. 



THE CRADLE. 



21 



HUSHABY. 







I » 



•#v^- 



-f-p-gz=: 



Hushaby, hushaby, Baby, do not weep, 



On thy downy 



^^ 



o i * ^ . fr H» 



fe*=p£±?^ 



?*-#? 



-#- #- 



-* -*w- 



§i 



gfcg: 



^S^^^ 



*=^ 



Vt-U- 



pillow lie, Softly, softly sleep, 



Softly, softly sleep. 



-rf-r 



« 



33 



#S 



~y~~ »~ 



-pz=k- 



-* — r - 



^ 



Hushaby, hushaby, 

Baby, do not weep, 

On thy downy pillow lie, 

Softly, softly sleep. 

Hushaby, hushaby, 
Now thine eyelids close ; 
While thy mother sitting nigh, 
Watches thy repose. 



Hushaby, hushaby, 
Slumber sweet be giv'n ; 
On thy downy pillow lie, 
Precious gift from heav'n ! 



22 NURSERY SONGS. 

SLUMBER SWEET. 



mm&^^^ 



3r 



Slumber sweet Thine eye - lids greet, My in - fant daughter dear; No 



SPBBiiig 



m 



^=3L 



-S=d 



5E 



footstep rude Shall here intrude, Nor stranger shall come near, Nor stranger shall come near. 



Slumber sweet 
Thine eyelids greet, 

My infant daughter dear : 
No footstep rude 
Shall here intrude, 

Nor stranger shall come near. 



Slumber sweet 
Thine eyelids greet 

Within thy mother's arms ; 
She little tells 
How feeling steals 

O'er all thy rising charms. 



Slumber sweet 
Thine eyelids greet, 

And gentle dreams be thine ; 
To thee be giv'n 
The bliss of heav'n, 

Where cherub angels shine. 



THE CRADLE 
SOFTLY IN THE CRADLE. 

-,s £- 



23 



m g~ ~ > h g #~ ~ f g g~~ : 






* 



Softly in the cradle lie, Thy father's hope, thy mother's joy ; 



i 



S=i 



£-& 






T & - u ■ w " - u 

Sweetly rest in balmy 



, Do not wake to sigh and weep. 



Softly in the cradle lie, 
Thy father's hope, thy mother's joy; 
Sweetly rest in balmy sleep, 
Do not wake to sigh and weep. 



Softly in the cradle lie ; 
A mother's heart thy wants supply ; 
She can rest if thou repose, 
Sweetly then thine eyelids close. 



Softly in the cradle lie, 
Frail bud of immortality; 

Soon thy blossom may unfold 
Fragrant 'mid the harps of gold. 



24 NURSERY SONGS. 

O, DO NOT WARE. 



mm 



: ¥=F 



0, do not wake, sweet lit - tie one, The night is dark and 



i 



*t 



^^^m 



zfcrfsfc 



drear j All that a mother could have done, Has been perform'd with 



i 



=5-^= 



I 



care, Has been per-form'd with care. 



O, do not wake, sweet little one, 
The night is dark and drear ; 

All that a mother could have done, 
Has been perform'd with care. 



The pillow 's soft on which you rest, 
And sweetly you have fed ; 

Still lean upon your mother's breast 
Your weary little head. 



O, do not wake, sweet little one, 
Nor tremble with alarm ; 

The Hand unseen you live upon 
Preserves you still from harm. 



THE CRADLE. 



25 



BE HUSH'D. 



**• 



£ 



^ 



£ 



3^ 



m 



r-ir 



t rt r u 






t r c t t i > , 

Be hush'd, my dear, Thy mother 'a near, Thou need'st no longer 



i 



:t=n 



-#!—*- 



5[ — « € a 



W 






i 



FTC 



"f *~ 



+- f 



weep ; Soft mel - o - dy She sings to thee, Now close thine eyes in 



PP-<Z> 



1 



-#-*- 



fe^E 



i 



¥- 



«( 



sleep, Now close thine eyes in sleep, sleep, sleep. 



Be hush'd, my dear. 

Dry every tear, 
In sweetest quiet keep ; 

O weep not so 

O'er infant woe, 
But close thine eyes in sleep. 

Be hush'd, my dear, 

No thought of fear 
Should break thy slumbers deep ; 

Angels above. 

With wings of love, 
Their vigils near thee keep. 



26 NURSERY SONGS. 

O, DEAR ONE. 




dear one, how sad is that moan, How languid and sickly that 



> 



^^ss 



p^F^=.g§^ 



"ST© p* | ' ^-> 9 S> 

eye ; My bosom responds to each groan, And echoes each deep-breathing sigh. 



FOR A CHILD DANGEROUSLY ILL. 

O dear one, how sad is that moan, 
How languid and sickly that eye ; 

My bosom responds to each groan, 
And echoes each deep-breathing sigh. 



Those flutt'ring pulsations I trace, 
The anguish that sits on thy brow, 

The paleness that covers thy face, 
Thy voice that is languid and low. 



O dear one, how deep is the grief, 
That withers my desolate heart ; 

Kind Heav'n bring thee speedy relief, 
Or thou from thy mother wilt part. 



I 



THE CRADLE. 

MY PRECIOUS LITTLE GEM. 

1 M 



27 






=1=31 



m 



__ 



my precious lit - tie gem, While I hold thee to my 



i 



i * 



^zza: 



fe^ 



^ — ^ — — ^ 

breast, May some heav'n in-spiring dream Soothe thy spirit in - to rest 



FOR A FATHERLESS CHrLD. 

O my precious little gem, 

While I hold thee to my breast, 
May some heav'n inspiring dream 

Soothe thy spirit into rest. 

But thy mother's heart is riv'n, 
Bitter anguish she must feel ; 

Nothing but the balm of heav'n 
Can her wounded spirit heal. 

Dark the night and dread the hour 
When thy father lay so low ; 

When he felt the monster's pow'r, 
Who could tell thy mother's woe ! 



But thou, image of his love, 

May'st in heav'n thy father see ; 

Ere his spirit soard above 
'Twas his latest prayer for thee. 



28 



NURSERY SONGS. 



SAFE SLEEPING. 

First Treble. 




s*jc * 



Safe sleeping 
Now sweetly 
Second Treble. 



on its 
sinking 



mother's breast, The smiling babe ap- 
in - to rest. Now wash'din sud-den 



N — P* 



m 



iss=ea^ 



SI 



rn^mm 



Hush, hush, my little baby dear, There's nobo-dy to hurt you here. 



p^^^SS^IilP 



Safe sleeping on its mother's breast, 

The smiling babe appears, 
Now sweetly sinking into rest, 

Now wash'd in sudden tears : 
Hush, hush, my little baby dear, 
There's nobody to hurt you here. 

Full many a summer sun must glow, 

And lighten up the skies, 
Before its tender limbs can grow 

To any thing of size : 
And all the while the mother's eye 
Must every little want supply. 

Then surely when each little limb 

Shall grow to healthy size ; 
And youth and manhood strengthen him 

For toil and enterprise, 
His mother's kindness is a debt 
He never, never will forget. 



Jane Taylor. 



\ 



1 



THE CRADLE. 



WEEP NOT. 

First Treble. 



^ 



m 



§EE2 



Weep not, my lit - tie one, Though thou art very ill, 

Second Treble. 



i 



mm 



m 



E£ 



SFFg 



Weep not, my lit - tie one, Though thou art very ill, 

Base. 



w& 



= 



For thou art not alone, Thy woes to feel, Thy woes to feel. 



i 



3^S 



3 



5 



=^=2 



For thou art not alone, Thy woes to feel, Thy woes to feel. 



® Hfr f f * 



I 



= 



FOR A STCK CHILD. 



Weep not, O little one, 
Though thou art very ill, 

For thou art not alone, 
Thy woes to feel. 

Each sigh of thine will heave 
An anxious mother's breast ; 

Each accent of thy grief 
Will break her rest. 



Each tear that thou dost shed 
Will cause her grief to flow : 

Her heart, since thine doth bleed, 
Is bleeding too. 

One Hand alone can heal ; 

That hand is ever near : 
O who can doubt His skill — 

Or gracious care ! 



30 



NURSERY SONGS. 



SLEEP, O SLEEP. 



i 



S^ 



3E 



3 



I& 



r tri t i^tin tt~ 

Sleep, O sleep ! While breezes so softly are blowing ; 



ng rt^ 



£ 



i; 



3 



fc 



Sleep, O sleep { While streamlets so gently are flowing. 



Cres. 

I 



Dim. pp. ZZZZzrz 



Hn 



ISIZ* ~,_ 



-*T" 



I I I 

Sleep, O sleep ! 



Sleep, 



Sleep, O sleep ! 
While spring her rich verdure is wearing, 

Sleep, O sleep ! 
While flow'rs in their pride are appearing, 
Sleep, &c. 



Sleep, O sleep! 
While birds in the forest are singing, 

Sleep, O sleep! 
While echoes with music are ringing, 
Sleep, &c. 



Sleep, O sleep ! 
While flocks in the meadows are straying, 

Sleep, O sleep ! 
While lambkins are merrily playing, 
Sleep. &c. 



Sleep, O sleep ! 
While angels are watching beside thee, 

Sleep, O sleep ! 
May blessings forever betide thee, 
Sleep. &-c. 



PABU ^E(G(DniO)o 



THE NURSERY. 

The songs of this department are introduced chiefly for children who are just begin- 
ning to entertain a few simple ideas and principles relative to things around them. 
The mother should commence with some of the easiest songs, and afterwards, as she 
proceeds with the more difficult ones, furnish the words with an occasional comment. 

THE 3IERRY LARK. 

First Treble. 



:£=± 



:£=*= 



z£=pr 



Si 

i - 'i . ^ . ^ 

Hark, hark, the merry lark, Be-ginning her morning 
Second Treble. 



song; 



3E 



zSr 



:SE 



tzfz 



m 



m 



S 



• g. 



Robin redbreast is still in her nest And silent is her tongue. 



=EHE 



& 



"rnz^z 



^± 



*ZZ£ZZtE_ 



Hark, hark, 
The merry lark, 
Beginning her morning song ; 
Robin redbreast 
Is still in her nest 
And silent is her tongue. 
No, no, 
It will not do, 
Though Robin may lie in bed ; 
"Early and bright 
As soon as 'tis light," 
My mother to me has said- 



See, see 
The busy bee 
A going from flower to flower, 
Carries a sting, 
While under her wing 
She holds her honeyed store. 
So, so, 

While busy too, 
In study or useful work ; 
In many a sweet 
Which we may meet 
Some poison'd sting may lurk. 



32 NURSERY SONGS. 

UP IN THE MORNING. 

Quick. 



35 FT C 



ism 



3£Z19 



izfc 



fr fr 



t r??i j \ i 



1 * V 



^ 



Up in the morning, up my child, See the sun, how bright and mild; 



§1 



t> ^=£—t=^=f- 



^ 



=fc= 



See the dew-drops every one Glistening in the sun : 



^m 






» 



tt 



Time for the dear one up to spring, While the merry bells do ring. 



Up in the morning, up my child, 
See the sun, how bright and mild ; 
See the dew-drops every one 

Glist'ning in the sun : 
Time for the dear one up to spring, 
While the merry bells do ring. 

Quick let me put your clean dress on, 
For the night is past and gone ; 
Now another day is giv'n, 

By our Lord in heav'n : 
Now when the morning air you feel, 
To your heav'nly Keeper kneel. 

Praise to the Lord for morning light, 
Praise for safety through the night, 
While the biids are singing all, 

On the Lord we call : 
Thus in the morning we will praise 
Our Redeemer all our days. A. 



Quick. 



to=£g 



THE NURSERY. 
FREE FROM SLUMBER. 

K 



33 



^ 



BE 



~¥~9~ 



Free from slumber, free from care, Free from thoughts of sadness, Let us greet the 



^m 



£^=£b H H ft 



5*- 



-*— ** 



song of gladness, 



With 



morning air With a 



a song of gladness. 



While the music of the grove 

On the ear is stealing, 
Thoughts of friendship and of love 

Waken tender feeling. 

Lo, the drops of pearly dew 

Upward are ascending, 
And the flowers with golden hue 

On the stalk are bending. 



Fragrance fills the gentle breeze 

Now incessant blowing : 
While beneath the forest trees 

Gentle rills are flowing. 

In the pastures fresh and green, 
Flocks and herds are straying ; 

Sol without a cloud is seen, 
Light and warmth conveying. 

See all nature join in praise — 

Earth, and air, and ocean ! 
Upward then to heaven we'll raise 

Songs of true devotion. Anon. 



34 



NURSERY SONGS. 



THE SHADOW. 



pmmmmmm 



Mamma, I see something so dark on the wall, It moves up and down and it 



nirwirmm 



rm 



seems very strange ; Sometimes it is large and sometimes it is small, Pray 



i 



m 



£=£=£ 



£^ 



m 



tell me what is it and why does it change? 

Child. Mamma, I see something so dark on the wall, 

It moves up and down and it seems very strange ; 
Sometimes it is large and sometimes it is small, 
Pray tell me what is it and why does it change 1 

Mamma. It is mamma's shadow that puzzles you so, 

And there is your own, close beside it, my love ; 
Now run round the room, it will go where you go, 

When you sit, 't will be still, when you rise, it will move. 

These wonderful shadows are caused by the light 
From fire and from candles upon us that falls ; 

Were we not sitting here, all that place would be bright, 

But the light can't shine through us, you know, on the walls. 

Now hold up your mouth and give me a sweet kiss, 
The shadows kiss, too, don't you see it, quite plain 7 
Child, O yes ! and I thank you for telling me this ; 

I'll not be afraid of a shadow again. Mrs. M. L. D. 



THE 

littlp: brother. 




*-#- 



s 



NURSERY. 



& 



35 



Little brother, darling boy, 



-3-- 



I 
I 



I 



You are very dear to me ; 




I am happy, full of joy, When your smiling face I see. 



Little brother, darling boy, 
You are very dear to me ; 

I am happy, full of joy 
When your smiling face I see. 



How I wish that you could speak. 

And could know the words I say : 
Pretty stories I would seek 

To amuse you all the day. 



Shake your rattle, here it is, 
Listen to its merry noise ; 

And when you are tired of this, 
I will buy you other toys. 

I'll be very kind to you, 

Never strike or make you cry, 
As some naughty children do, 

Quite forgetting God is nigh. 



Mrs. M. L. D. 



36 



NURSERY SONGS. 



DAWN OF DAY. 

First Treble. 



— ^ w 

Come, a - rise from thy sleep, 
Through the green bushes peep, 
Second Treble. 



Birds sweetly are 



g^^ 



*=£■ 



-#- 



J=EE? 1 



^E 



-o. 



p — w — > w~ 

straying, Their bright plumes displaying, At 



dawn of day. 



-#-• 



E 



1 



W^Wi 



Let us breathe the fresh air, 
For the morning is fair, 
And the forest is ringing 
With merry birds singing 

At dawn of day. 

Come along for a talk 
Or a sweet morning walk, 
While the garden discloses 
Its bright blushing roses, 

At dawn of day. 

But first to our King 
Let us joyfully sing, 
And praises be paying, 
'Tis good to be praying 

At dawn of day. 



THE NURSERY. 
TIME TO ARISE. 



37 



Quick. 



^^S 



g=r=p=^ 



B 



* * y 



£=£ 



v — i? — ? r 

Father and mother, 'tis time to arise, 



Sun has a- ris- en to 



■f—r-f- 



fff^- ^rx£ g?f 



s 



1? — p- 



S^EE 



^P 



S 



^E 



^ - ~P 1 ? P P *r 

brighten the skies ; Every bird is singing high ; Birds are glad, and so am I. 



m 



iV^-H- 



££p 



c 



££ 



^? 



*#: 



Father and mother, 'tis time to arise, 
Sun has arisen to brighten the skies ; 

Every bird is singing high ; 

Birds are glad, and so am I. 

Merrily, merrily there in the tree, 
Bluebird and robin are singing to me ; 

Round the window see them fly ; 

Birds are glad, and so am I. 

Glad little robin, you never can know, 
Who is the Maker that fashion'd you so; 

Yet you cannot weep or sigh ; 

Birds are glad, and so am I. 

He who created the birds of the air, 
Securely will keep me from trouble and care : 

He has taught the birds to fly; 

Birds are glad, and so am I. A. 



38 NURSERY SONGS. 

O WILD IS THY JOY. 

Quick. 



|5=Bg 



^ m- ±ztj 



I 



£fe*EP 



y w p p 1 p- p * 

O wild is thy joy, My affectionate boy, What visions of fancy come o'er thee 1 



i 



SEE 



PBBP 



Thy spirit so proud, And thy laughter so loud, What transports are glit'ring before thee 1 

O wild is thy joy,* 

My affectionate boy, 
What visions of fancy come o'er thee 1 

Thy spirit so proud, 

And thy laughter so loud — 
What transports are glit'ring before thee 1 

Dost think of a day 

Thou mayst ramble and play, 
O'er the meadows, the forests, and mountains ? 

Or in the sweet vale, 

'Mong the lilies so pale, 
By the side of the rills and the fountains ? 

Some glim'rings of thought 

Perchance thou hast caught, 
While thy spirit within thee rejoices, 

Some simple delight, 

Some object of sight 
Or sound in the mingling of voices. 

O, brief is thy mirth, 

For the visions of earth, 
Like the shadows of noonday, are flying : 

But joys that are pure, 

Shall forever endure, 
Though earth and its transports are dying. 

* The boy alluded to in this instance, is supposed not to be within hearing of the song, while an- 
other little one is listening. 



THE NURSERY. 



39 



LITTLE JACK. 



|i 



Z ¥=K- 



*=P==^E 



S 



There was 



one little Jack, Not 



very long back, And 'tis 



3^ 

-* -J— 



-e— 



-f- 



=P=£ 



said, to his lasting dis - grace, That he never was seen With his 



^ 



» 



hands at all clean, Nor yet ev - er clean was his face. 

There was one little Jack, 

Not very long back, 
And 'tis said to his lasting disgrace, 

That he never was seen 

With his hands at all clean, 
Nor yet ever clean was his face. 

His kind friends were much hurt 

To see so much dirt, 
And often and well did they scour ; 

But all was in vain, 

He was dirty again 
Before they had done it an hour. 

When to wash he was sent, 

He reluctantly went 
With water to splash himself o'er ; 

But he left the black streaks 

All over his cheeks 
And made them look worse than before. 

All the idle and bad 

May much like this lad, 
Be dirty and black, to be sure : 

But all good boys are seen 

To be decent and clean, 
Although they are ever so poor. Jane Taylor. 



40 



NURSERY SONGS. 



THE FIELD. 



Quick. 



We'll go to the field for some flowers, The meadows are verdant and 



■EJU-P-e -e 



*•= 



P— * ' » 0— P— 0— 0— » i ' f— F~ 



gay ; How fragrant they are since the showers ; How bright and how lovely the 



Jei 



I 



s^ 



i 



1 



fcjfc 



FF T^^^^F F? 



day, 



How bright and how love - ly the 



day. 



We'll go to the field for some flowers, 
The meadows are verdant and gay ; 

How fragrant they are since the showers ; 
How bright and how lovely the day. 

But who made the pretty green trees ? 

And who made the beautiful flowers'? 
Who sweetens with roses the breeze ? 

Who makes them all fresh with the showers 1 

5 Tis our Heavenly Father above, 
Who makes every thing that we see ; 

And who with compassion and love 

Regards such young children as we. Anon. 



i 



THE NURSERY. 
THE LITTLE BIRD. 

Ik i » ■. «* &_ 



41 



m 



3E 



RTF 



:bz 



r r 



JCZMZ 



:tz 



i 



B33 



HT 1 ? 



=3=fc 



O do not frighten or destroy The little bird with golden wing, That 



I 



sg 



fesM^feto 



35 



K-t.-e t 






I 



carols forth the notes of joy To cheer us in the time of spring. 



O do not frighten or destroy 

The little bird with golden wing ; 

That carols forth the notes of joy 
To cheer us in the time of spring. 

See how she nestles on the bough, 
And nourishes her tender young ; 

Mark how her warm affections flow, 
And listen to her gentle song. 

'Tis cruel to disturb her nest, 
Or pilfer to supply a cage ; 

We who with liberty are blest, 
Should never in such acts engage. 

Then do not frighten or destroy 
The little bird with golden wing, 

But oft, like her, thy voice employ, 
The Author of creation sing. H. 



42 NURSERYSONGS. 

THE HUMMING-BIRD. 

See where, in a thicket of roses, The humming-bird sweetly re - poses, For 



fete feSSS^ £E& J 



^^S^ ^^S^^^ gE^B 

^^w^ 



beauty so justly ad - mired ; How busi - ly he has been flying, Sweet 



*e£?£££ 



! 



=P=3- 



£=EiE 



mmm 



ctrFtf 



1 F" 

slumber he now is en - - joying, The poor little creature i% tired. 



But there is a humble-bee coming, 
He makes such a terrible drumming, 

I wish he could ever be still : 
And now there's a robin so near him, 
The humming-bird surely will hear him ; 

I wish he would shut up his bill. 



But I have been jumping and stamping : 
I made with my singing and romping 

More noise than the robin or bee : 
And as dear little sister was sleeping, 
I woke her and set her to weeping ; 

My fault I now clearly can see. H. 



±* 



THE NURSERY. 
AH, WHY WILL MY DEAR. 



43 



*^E^ 



# Q r» 



*=?=$ 



_| » 9 



P 



Ah, why will my dear little child be so cross, And cry, and look sulky and 



i 



s 



-*— *— 



*= 



:f-g-^ 



pout 1 



To lose her sweet smile is a ter - ri- ble loss : I can't even 



i 



1p 



f 



*=P^ 



kiss her without, 



I can't even 



kiss her without. 



WASHING AND DRESSING. 

Ah, why will my dear little girl be so cross, 

And cry, and look sulky, and pouf? 
To lose her sweet smile is a terrible loss : 

I can't even kiss her without. 

You say you don't like to be wash'd and be dress'd : 

But would you be dirty and foul 1 
Come, drive that long sob from your dear little breast, 

And clear your sweet face from its scowl. 

If the water is cold and the comb hurts your head, 

And the soap has got into your eye,* 
Will the water grow warmer for alf that you've said 1 

What good will it do you to cry 1 

It is not to tease you and hurt you, my sweet, 

But only for kindness and care, 
That I wash you and dress you and make you look neat, 

And comb out your tanglesome hair. 

I don't mind the trouble, if you will not cry, 

But pay me for all with a kiss, 
That's right, — take the towel and wipe your wet eye : 
I thought you'd be good after this. Jane Taylor. 
* This process, by the way, is often performer! so roughly as to occasion no inconsiderable pain. 



44 



NURSERY SONGS. 



THE ROBIN. 



^t t tit xi re n rTrrrer 



O poor little robin, so cold and so wet, Say, what are you doing to- 



s^^^m 



£ 



day 1 The winter is coining, then what will you eat 1 And 



Efe£=gjf?=fl^iE##&igi 



fxfrPWr 



s 



where are you going to stay, And where are you going to stay ? 

O, poor little robin, so cold and so wet, 

Say, what are you doing to-day 1 
The winter is coming, then what will you eat t 

And where are you going to stay? 

Your nest is so open, so cold and so poor, 

You never can live there again ; 
O come, pretty robin, come into our door, 

We'll shelter you from the cold rain. 

We've clean beds to sleep in, and water to drink, 

And things very nice for your food ; 
Come, come, pretty robin ; O how can you think 

To fly off again in the wood ! 

The bird will not listen ; but children so young, 

So hungry, so cold and so wet, 
May share in my cottage, and join in my song ; 

And they shall have something to eat. 



THE NURSERY. 
CHERRIES ARE RIPE. 



45 



^ 



^^ 



e^ 



Cherries are ripe, 
Cherries are ripe, 



Cherries are ripe, O give the baby one ; 
Cherries are ripe, But baby shall have none j 



**-*- 



Si 



^ 



SE 



Babies are too young to choose ; Cherries are too sour to use ; 



§ 



±*z 



^j=£w-g 



But by and by, Made in a pie, No one will them re - fuse. 



Cherries are ripe, 

Cherries are ripe, 
O give the baby one; 

Cherries are ripe, 

Cherries are ripe, 
But baby shall have none : 
Babies are too young to choose ; 
Cherries are too sour to use ; 

But by and by, 

Made in a pie, 
No one will them refuse. 



Up in the tree 
Robin I see, 
Picking one by one ; 
Shaking his bill, 
Getting his fill, 
Down his throat they run : 
Robins want no cherry pie, 
Quick they eat and off they fly. 
My little child, 
Patient and mild, 
Surely will not cry. 



Cherries are ripe, 
Cherries are ripe, 

But we will let them fall. 
Cherries are ripe, 
Cherries are ripe, 

But bad for babies small. 
Gladly follow mother's will, 
Be obedient, soft and still, 
Waiting awhile, 
Delighted you'll smile, 

And joyful eat your fill. 



46 NURSERY SONGS. 

HARK, THE BELL. 



5 



-up — *•- 



^se 



Hark, the bell, Hear it swell, Sounding thro' the woods and fields, Echoing o'er the 



m 



ig 



s 



± 



F 11 ^ 



hills and dales, 'Tis Sabbath day, Do not stray, Do not work or play. 



THE SABBATH. 

Hark, the bell, 

Hear it swell, 
Sounding through the woods and fields, 
Echoing o'er the hills and dales : 

'Tis Sabbath day, 

Do not stray, 

Do not work or play. 

Hark, the bell, 

Hear it swell, 
Sounding through the woods and fields, 
Echoing o'er the hills and dales, 

'Tis Sabbath day, 

Don't delay, 

Learn the heavenly way. 



Hark, the bell, 

Hear it swell, 
Sounding through the woods and fields, 
Echoing o'er the hills and dales, 

'Tis Sabbath day, 

Sing and pray, 

Listen and obey. 



THE NURSERY. 



BABY IS CRYING. 



47 

[To be sung by the older children. 



Quick. 



g^ ^-^ ^ gEEggggp^ 



-> k k - 



p — p, — ? - 



Baby is crying, While mother is trying To make him be happy and 



1 



~ 



& 



-*T 



still ; How shall we relieve him, Or what shall we give him, A 



-f— t 



fc£ *ft^H ^ ^^tep 



top or a whistle or bell, A top or a whistle or bell'? 

I wish he were quiet, 

He makes such a riot 

That nobody else can be heard; 

See how he dislikes her, 

And wickedly strikes her, 

O baby, how very absurd ! 

Not love your dear mother 
And sister and brother, 
Who always are loving and true ! 
O, be not so naughty, 
So cross and so haughty, 
While we are so tender of you. 

Dear mother must whip him, 
In quiet to keep him, 
If better he will not behave : 
Why wont he be kinder, 
And love her and mind her ? 
Then all of that trouble he'll save. 

* This must of course be understood els the language of affectionate solicitude, and not as tho 
expression of peevishness or ill natured censure. 



48 NURSERY SONGS. 

BABY IS SICK. 



s=s 



^^^^^^ 



=r 



Baby is sick to-day, His face is very pale : He will not 



.#-#. 



^ 



i=5 



szqs,; 



g33^^^5^^3f 



**- 



^^ 



K N 



S3 



£ 



laugh or play, I wish that he were well. 



Baby is sick. 



3 t HU£jMi±* 



=B=3^ 



m 



Baby is sick to-day, 

His face is very pale : 
He will not laugh or play, 

I wish that he were well. 

Shall we give him some meat, 
Some pudding, or some pie 1 

What shall he have to eat 1 
I hate to hear him cry. 

0, no, 'twould never do, 

Such things would make him worse j 
They are unwholesome too, 

For children well, like us. 

Babies love simple food, 

And we are very small ; 
Rich things do us no good, 

We'll give him none at all. 



THE NURSERY. 



49 



THE APPEAL.* 

h 



^ 



mmm 



s 



rr 



r c 



[ 



^ * 



Father, father, kiss thy child, Hear my lit - tie song ; 



£seM 



£=£ 



1 



=?=?= 



rrFT 



When my mother sweetly smiled — Father passed a - long. 



Father, father, kiss thy child, 

Hear my little song ; 
When my mother sweetly smil'd- 

Father pass'd along. 



Father, father, kiss thy child, 

Thy affection prove ; 
When my mother sweetly smil'd. 

All her look was love. 



Father, father, kiss thy child, 

Do not make me cry : 
When my mother sweetly smil'd, 

Father pass'd me by. 



Ortonville was first suggested by this song, which was an earlier composition. 
4 



50 NURSERY SONGS. 

SEE THE NAUGHTY KITTEN. 



i 



3BE 



£ 






is 



See the naughty kitten, 
Playing with the knittin' ; 



How she rolls the ball about! 



§ 



±*z 



j . J* 1 1 J» 



s 



s 



How she pulls the stitches out ! Naughty, naughty kitten. 



See the naughty kitten, 
Playing with the knittin' : 
How she rolls the ball about f 
How she pulls the stitches out ! 
Naughty, naughty kitten. 

Will you run and catch her 1 
Will you try to teach her 1 
Bring the pretty little book, 
See if in it she will look 1 
Do not let her scratch you. 

What a naughty pussy, 
All the while so dosy, 
Pussy only mew'd and purr'd, 
Would not read a single word, 
Naughty, naughty pussy. 



Kittens know but little, 

Knitting yarn is brittle, 
Children should not do so ill, 
They should learn to read and spell, 

Not be full of prattle. 



THE NURSERY. 
O WHAT A NAUGHTY DOG. 



51 



Quick. 



I^S 



V=at=±: 



3s 



*=c 



s^ 



F — P~ 
O what a naughty dog is that, 



To quarrel with the pussy cat, 



A- 



i 



m 



m 



ee 



S3 



^ 



bout a little piece of meat That sister gave for them to eat; Pussy, too, looks 



I 



m^ 



3^ 



m 



£ 



S 



3= 



very shy, And lifts her back up very high ; very 



high. 



O, what a naughty dog is that, 
To quarrel with the pussy cat, 
About a little piece of meat 
That sister gave for them to eat ; 
Pussy too, looks very shy, 
And lifts her back up very high. 

Hark, how he growls and barks at her, 
See how she raises up her fur; 
And now he snatches for the piece, 
And now she's spitting in his face, 
O for shame ! poor dog and cat, 
To quarrel for a thing like that. 



Brothers and sisters should be kind, 
And no such vile examples mind, 
While dogs and cats may think it right 
To quarrel for their appetite : 
Children always should agree, 
Both when they eat and when they play. 



52 



NURSERY SONGS. 



\ 



TO INFANT SCHOOL. 

First Treble. 



^s 



mmm 



m^m 



f 

ifan 



To infant school, to infant school, I hear the little bell ; 
Second Treble. 



PP 



S 



fe=£±: 



Base. 



To infant school, to infant school, I hear the little bell 



^ 






HH*-f-»- 



-P— £~- 



f-+- 



-S=3=4- 



&± 



F=G=E4 



?S 



^z^^U 



SI 



S=*z 



come with me to infant school, And learn to read and spell, And learn to read and spell. 



B33 



^JS^^^ ^Pt^ 



3 



E^z 



-S—d—d- 



come with me to infant school, And learn to read and spell, And learn to read and spell. 



^Eggg 



I 



fet 



±=£=±z 



±=tt 



To infant school, to infant school, 

I do not like to wait ; 
O, come with me to infant school, 

Or we shall be too late. 

To infant school, to infant school, 
We must not stop to play ; 

O, come with me to infant school, 
And I will lead the way. 

To infant school, to infant school, 
We'll sweetly march and sing ; 

O, come with me to infant school 
The bell begins to ring. 



THE NURSERY. 
OH! DON'T HURT THE DOG. 



53 



Quick. 



-^ 

honest 



Oh ! don't hurt the dog, poor 



old Tray ; What 



3 



±=t 



good will it do you to drive him away 1 Kind treatment is justly 



his 



3-J» — i-p 1 — r .. . . — p=-f. — r s. * * — p - 


£p— d- J 1 — £--H — -^-J 1 — b— is — ! — J-- 



right j 



Re 



member how faithful he is to his charge, And 



i 



it 



g?T^r3 3Sg^ 



g 



?a 



■p—p ( ^ p p 

barks at the rogues when we set him at large, And guards us by day and by night. 



Oh ! don't hurt the dog, poor honest old Tray ; 
What good will it do you to drive him away 1 

Kind treatment is justly his right ; 
Remember how faithful he is to his charge, 
And barks at the rogues when we set him at large, 

And guards us by day and by night. 



If you are a boy and Tray but a beast, 

I think it should teach you one lesson at least, 

You ought to act better than he ; 
And if without reason, or judgment, or sense, 
Tray does as we bid him and gives no offence, 
How diligent Richard should be ! Jane Taylor. 



54 

Expressive 



NURSERY SONGS. 
TOLL THE BELL. 



Ml 



Sgg^f^ 



Toll the bell, Toll the bell, Ring the ba - by's knell ; 



tJ L—j-l-f^ ^ZJphj 



f=frf?figlfr 



-?~^~*~< 



Low with the dead, It must be laid. Ba - by, fare - well. 



THE FUNERAL. 



Toll the bell, 

Toll the bell, 

Ring the baby's knell ; 

Low with the dead 

It must be laid, 

Baby, farewell. 



Toll the bell, 

Toll the bell, 

Ring the baby's knell ; 

Slow from the hall, 

Moves the dark pall, 

Baby, farewell. 



Toll the bell, 
Toll the bell, 
Ring the baby's knell ; 
Pale is its face, 
And white its dress, 
Baby, farewell. 



Toll the bell, 
Toll the bell, 
Ring the baby's knell ; 
Now earth to earth 
'Neath the green turf, 
Baby, farewell. 



Toll the bell, 

Toll the bell, 

Ring the baby's knell ; 

Beyond the skies 

Its spirit flies, 

Baby, farewell. 



ipaib^ ^PianiEiO) 



THE CLASS ROOM. 

Songs of instruction are not always the most interesting with regard to taste; but 
there are occasional exceptions against this remark ; nor does it apply with the same 
strictness in regard to young children that it does in reference to adults. Such 
songs should be associated with pleasant remarks and illustrations ; and occasionally 
with such series of questions as may be suggested by the language which is sung. 
The songs in this department are adapted to children who have passed the period of 
prattling infancy. 



CREATION. 



I 



Quick. 



5^: 



=1^ 



fe 



q=l 



g^s 



=s 



-0-0- 



-+T- 



He who spread out the sky, That broad blue cano - py, Who made the glorious sun, 



i 



m 



-*-+- 



r r r 



-0*0- 



W 



^£ 



zeis^z 



zzrs^i 



#T#- 



The moon to shine by night, The stars with eye so bright, He made thee, little one. 



He who spread out the sky, 
That broad blue canopy. 

Who made the glorious sun, 
The moon to shine by night, 
The stars with eye so bright, 

He made thee, little one. 



He who with care doth keep 
The nested birds that sleep; 

And when their rest is done, 
Doth guide them through the sky, 
And feed them when they cry, 

He loves thee, little one. L. H. S. 



QUESTIONS. 

1. Who made you 1 

2. Who made the sky, the sun, the moon, and the stars'? 

3. Who takes care of the birds and feeds them 1 

4. Does the Lord take care of little children 1 

5. Does he love them when they are his children 1 



56 



NURSERY SONGS. 



I 



THE ARK AND DOVE, 

First Treble. 

SEE 



£ 



£ 



ii 



e: 



There was a noble ark, 
Sailing o'er waters dark, 
Second Treble. 



And wide around : Not one tall tree was 



H 



& 



!& 



=B 



f^ 



3= 



3J* 



H 



-p— f- 



ErEEEP 



£ 



S 



~y~y~ 



-£=£- 



4- 



seen, Nor flower nor leaf of green, All, all was drown'd, All, all was drown'd. 



§§ 



gggj ^ 



szqs 



I 



S 



^" I "" ^ == ^ 



F — F~ 



Then a soft wing was spread, 
And o'er the billows dread, 

A meek dove flew ; 
But on that shoreless tide, 
No living thing she spied 

To cheer her view — 

So to the ark she fled, 
With weary, drooping head. 

To seek for rest ; 
Christ is thy ark, my love, 
Thou art the tender dove, 

Fly to his breast. L. H. S. 

QUE STIONS . 

1. Who built the ark ? 2. What was put into it ? 

3. Was the rest of the world destroyed ] 4. For whatl 

5. Why was the dove sent out, and why did she return 1 

6. Why is Christ called an ark ? 



I 



Mod. 



BROWN. 

^ > i^ 



THE CLASS ROOM. 

i d i ~ a m Z2 — 



57 



Child, you're old enough to know That you need a Saviour's 



n it f i 


N 


n 


(* ^ 










\ j if 


h il "* 1 


! i 


m 




P 1 m 




» r - u 


r 









n '■ S^* 


0. & a 




& & * r* 




r 


1 


9 


\\7 ** 


m* m o 


* • 


? 


s 


— **— 





love: 



W V V 

That you are 



sinner, too, All your wicked actions 



I 



prove, All your 



u L. t 

wicked 



actions 



prove. 



Child, you're old enough to know 
That you need a Saviour's love : 

That you are a sinner, too, 
All your wicked actions prove. 

When you feel your bosom swell, 
Angry passions rise within, 

And your lips speak what they feel, 
Something tells you — there is sin. 

Christ was once a little child, 
But his heart was pure within ; 

Always gentle, kind and mild ; 
Child, you must be just like him. 



I 



B. 



* The thought? contained in this song may suggest a profitable method of teaching the doctrines 
of native depravity, and salvation through a bleeding Saviour. The pure example of Christ also, 
when frequently presented to the infantile mind, operates as a powerful restraint. 



58 



NURSERY SONGS. 
THE MOON IS VERY FAIR. 

M I* I f» ■ ». ■ 



5§y 




a 



v 



-I h 



m? 



as 



sf 



The moon is very fair and bright, And rises very high ; 
I think it is a pretty sight, To see it in the sky ; 






SeHS 



H-fi- 



Se 



£S 






ss 



I 



shone upon me where I lay, And seem'd almost as bright as day. 



g ^f- r-r-=fJ££ £EaibiSs 



PPSI 



f^= f= f 



The moon is very fair and bright 

And rises very high ; 
I think it is a pretty sight, 

To see it in the sky ; 
It shone upon me where I lay, 
And seem'd almost as bright as day. 



The sun is brighter still than they, 

He blazes in the skies : 
1 dare not turn my face that way, 

Unless I shut my eyes : 
Yet when he shines our hearts revive, 
And all the trees rejoice and thrive. 



The stars are very pretty too, 

And scatter'd all about ; 
At first there seem a very few, 

But soon the rest come out : 
I'm sure I could not count them all, 
They are so very bright and small. 



God made and keeps them every one 

By his great power and might ; 
He is more glorious than the sun, 

And all the stars of light : 
But when we end our mortal race, 
The pure in heart shall see his face. 

Jane Taylor. 



THE CLASS ROOM. 
THE COMMASDMENTS.* 



59 



£E 



^EgJEgE£=g 



s 



=*3=§f: 



One God I must worship su-preme, And ne'er before 



3 



images bow ; 



ill 



H 



&m 



it. 



^S 



v r— " — w — ? 

I must not speak light of his name, But pay to him ev - e - ry 



One God I must worship supreme, 
And ne'er before images bow, 

I must not speak light of his name, 
But pay to him every vow. 



I'm bound to remember with care, 
The Sabbath, so hallow'd and pure ; 

To honor my parents so dear, 

That my life may the longer endure. 



Foul murder, adult'ry, or theft, 
Or falsehood, I ne'er will pursue: 

Or covet a bribe or a gift, 

Or extort from my neighbor his due. 



Now help me, O Father in heav'n, 

To keep these commandments with zeal ; 

In the strength that through Jesus is given 
To those who are doing thy will. 



* In connection with this song, the ten commandments may be recited, in such a manner as to 
show their meaning, and illustrate the thoughts contained in the hymn. 



60 NURSERY SONGS. 

GOOD LITTLE GIRLS. 



5 



^ 



±E 



3r 

Two good lit - tie girls, Ma - ri - anne and Ma - ria, As 



m 



£ 



: f=^=F :: 



hap- pi- ly liv'd as good girls could de-sire ; And tho' they were neither grave, 



?=£ 



^P= 



g 



m 



sullen, nor mute, They seldom or never were heard to dispute. 

Two good little girls, Marianne and Maria, 
As happily liv'd as good girls could desire ; 
And though they were neither grave, sullen, nor mute, 
i?hey seldom or never were heard to dispute. 

f one wants a thing that the other could get, 
They never are scratching or scrambling for it, 
But each one is willing to give up her right ; 
They'd rather have nothing than quarrel and fight. 

If one of them happens to have something nice, 
Directly she offers her sister a slice ; 
And not like to some greedy children I've known, 
Who would go in a corner and eat it alone. 

When papa or mama had a job to be done, 

These good little girls would immediately run, 

And not stand disputing to which it belonged, 

And grumble and fret and declare they were wronged. 

Whatever occurred in their work or their play, 

They were willing to yield and give up their own way ; 

Then let us all try their example to mind, 

And always like them be obliging and kind. Jane Taylor. 



THE CLASS ROOM. 
HOW I LOVE MY TENDER MOTHER.* 



61 



I 



imm 



How I love my tender mother, How I love my father dear; 
How I love my little brother, And my sis - ter so sin- cere : 



-9— 



=s 



SE 



They are all both kind and true, And they love me dear-ly too. 



How I love my tender mother, 
How I love my father dear j 

How I love my little brother, 
And my sister so sincere : 

They are all both kind and true, 

And they love me dearly too. 

Be my neighbor proud or lowly, 
He shall my affection share ; 

Be he sinful, be he holy, 

He may claim my earnest prayer : 

Let me not unfeeling prove, 

Nor myself too dearly love. 



But of all affection giv'n, 

God on high demands the most ; 
God the Father in the heav'n. 

God the Son and Holy Ghost : 
Three in One and One in Three ; 
Be thou all in all to me. 

* The child may be taught, in connection with this son*, how that "love is the fulfilling of the 
law 1 '— love that includes all the characteristics mentioned in the Gospel. The last stanza introduces 
also the subject of the blessed Trinity, in such a manner as to invite explanation. 



62 NURSERY SONGS. 

THE BEES. 

,S fe |S- 



fS^^M^B 



O, mother dear, pray tell me where The bees in winter stay 1 

&.X f,f,H 



*A 



«=^EB ^ 



j^=££ 



§ 



i-trtf 



£ 



PE^f 



§ 



32 



rfFF^rrt 



The flow'rs are gone they fed up - on, So sweet in summer's day. 



My child, they live within the hive, 

And have enough to eat : 
Amid the storm they're clean and warm, 

Their food is very sweet. 

Say, mother dear, how came it there ? 

Did father feed them so ? 
I see no way in winter's day 

That honey has to grow. 

No, no, my child, in summer mild, 

The bees laid up their store 
Of precious drops in little cups, 

'Till they would want no more. 

In cups you said, — how are they made? 

Are they as large as ours 1 
O no, they're all made nice and small 

Of wax, found in the flow'rs. 

Our summer's day to work and play, 

Is now in mercy giv'n, 
And we must strive long as we live 

To lay up stores in hfav'n. 



THE CLASS ROOM. 
I SAW AN OLD COTTAGE. 



63 



ss 



=s 



£^ 



£ 



I saw an old cottage of clay, And only of mud was the 



£B^ h ^ih4ebs 



s 



^= 



^ 



3=3=*- 



$*m 


~l£ 


=q^-fc| v 




r*r~\ 


,. r-f 


* # 






/. # 


^A 


1 m J 


r * m 


a 1 * 


r > 


i r # 


r 


1 


ft A ' 




#. # # 


I r 


• * 1 


5 * 


L ! 1 




1 


£7 j 


*. # 




* Li 1 




* * 


* > L 






floor ; 'Twas all falling into de - cay And snow drifted in at the door. 


Uff 




•* P» •%. 




■* * 




1 1 


A # 


*f5 


K x 


1 ' ' 


11 


1 P J 


I s ** 


-1 li 


n n 


\ tt 


1 d ' 


1 * a 


' # 


J m * 


J J 


-J_IL 


*y 


1 a 


*. • * 


* m 


• # 


#• # 


# ■ « 


^rlr 


^ V 


#•* 

















Yet there a poor family dwelt, 

In a cottage so dismal and rude ; 
And though keenest hunger they felt, 

They'd scarcely a morsel of food. 

The children were crying for bread, 
And to their poor mother would run — 

11 O, give us some breakfast," they said. 
Alas ! their poor mother had none. 

O then let the wealthy and gay 

But see such a hovel as this ; 
And in a poor cottage of clay, 

Learn what real misery is. 

The little that I have to spare, 

I never will squander away ; 
While thousands of people there are 

As poor and as wretched as they. Jane Tayloh 



64 NURSERY SONGS. 

THE CHATTERBOX.* 



lfr=£l 



-0- 



£ 



From morning till night it was Lucy's delight, To 



le^ 



chatter and talk without stopping ; There was not a day but she 



£ 



^ 



:£z=£ 



rattled away, Like water for - ever 



dropping. 



THE CHATTERBOX. 

From morning till night it was Lucy's delight, 

To chatter and talk without stopping ; 
There was not a day but she rattled away, 

Like water forever a dropping. 

As soon as she rose, while she put on her clothes, 

'Twas vain to endeavor to still her ; 
Nor once did she lack to continue her clack. 

Till again she lay down on her pillow. 

How very absurd ! and have you not heard 
That much tongue and few brains are connected 1 

That they are supposed to think least who talk most 1 
Their wisdom is always suspected. 

While Lucy was young, if she'd bridled her tongue, 

With a little good sense and exertion, 
Who knows but she might now have been our delight, 

Instead of our jest and aversion ! Jane Taylor. 

* This is an excellent lesson for children who are prone to be talkative ; especially those who 
have a little advanced beyond the period of early infancy. 



THE CLASS ROOM. 



65 



THE SCALE.- 



i 



m=^=^m 



SE: 



3F 



Come, let us learn to sing, Do re mi fa sol la si do; 
Loud let our voices ring, Do re mi fa sol la si do 



;} 



tVf 



gpE 



3Z^ 



w^?m 



Let us sing with open sound, ) ~ , ■ ». .... , 

ttit^l s /» ii j j > Do si la sol fa mi re do. 

With our voices full and round, $ 

Come, let us learn to sing, 
Do re mi fa sol la si do ; 

Loud let our voices ring, 
Do re mi fa sol la si do ; 

Let us sing with open sound, 

With our voices full and round, 
Do si la sol fa mi re do. 

This is the scale so sweet, 
Do re mi fa sol la si do ; 

Sing it with accent meet, 
Do re mi fa sol la si do ; 

First ascend in notes so true, 

Then descend in order too, 
Do si la sol fa mi re do. 

Children should love to sing, 
Do re mi fa sol la si do ; 

Praise to the heav'nly King, 
Do re mi fa sol la si do ; 

Let us learn his face to seek, 

Then aloud his praise we'll speak, 
Do si la sol fa mi re do. 

* Great care should here be taken, that the sounds of the scale are accurately tuned ; and that 
the suggestions given in the song, in reference to the formation of the voice, be successfully reduced 
to practice. 

5 



66 NURSERY SONGS. 

LEARNING TO SING. 



§ 



±: 



g=^ 



^ 



BS 



^g^^^^ 



E^ 



My schoolmates are learning to sing, And I will be one of the 



^ I ^#p^^^ 



class ; My voice shall with melody ring, In tenor, or treble, or 



i 



i 



£3=E 



base, In tenor, or treble, or 



base. 



My schoolmates are learning to sing, 
And I will be one of the class ; 

My voice shall with melody ring, 
In tenor, or treble, or base. 



The lessons I'll labor to learn ; 

The rules I will strictly regard ; 
Their meaning I'll try to discern, 

Though sometimes they prove to be hard. 



My efforts will not be in vain ; 

My time is not running to waste ; 
By little and little I'll gain, 

Till all is accomplished at last. 



THE CLASS ROOM. 
THE LITTLE LA3IB. 



67 






wm 



i=i3 



I saw a little lamb to-day, It was not very old ; 
Close by its mother's side it lay, So soft within the fold : 



&: 



fZZZS a *Zt^ *_ 



1 



r^i 



-a- -0- 



g* — 5?* -a- 



(]# * M P-\ 


#• 




•— i 


-v= > >i v- v 


— * 1 


i~> '"r 




A # +* 




& i 1 J i* 


1 |> 


! •» > 


3 


Mh S<* 


™ 


^ 


r #* 


^ ^ » ^ 1 & i 


& 1 


& r & 


Si 


vV "^ 




^ 




* 5 ' * 


** 




a/ 

It felt 

1 - * 


no 


sorrow, 


pain, or fear, While such a 


comforter was near. 








rs - 


jS |>. - ■ 




I 2 


/ ss # ' r 


#• - 


••■ h I 


1 N ! * 


^ ir r 






r. 




* * s 




^^ i 


* ^ ? ri 


V? >» 




< 


■ V 


** ' 


J 


l J 1 ! 2 ■ 


a/ ^ 




*» 




-«- 


9 


-«- 


-J- *#J- 





Sweet little lamb, you cannot know 
What blessing I have lost : 

Were you like me, what could you do 
Amid the wintry frost 1 

My clothes are thin, my food is poor, 

And I must beg from door to door. 

I had a mother once, like you, 

To keep me by her side : 
She cherish'd me and lov'd me too ; 

But soon, alas ! she died : 
Now sorrowful and full of care. 
I'm lone and weary everywhere. 



3Iy~father was not kind to me, 
He went away from home ; 

I long'd once more his face to see, 
But he would never come : 

Before he died he would be found 

Sleeping upon the naked ground. 

I must not weep and break my heart, 
They tell me not to grieve : 

Sometimes I wish I could depart, 
And find a peaceful grave : 

They say such sorrows never come 

To those who slumber in the tomb. 



'Twas thus a little orphan sung, 
Her lonely heart to cheer ; 

Before she wander'd very long, 
She found a Saviour near : 

He bade her seek his smiling face, 

And find in heav'n a dwelling place. 



68 



NURSERY SONGS. 
THE ORPHAN. 



t 



i 



!&+¥■ 



-&9- 



fr^nrfj> \ tm 



O, if I were a robin, I'd soon be on the wing ; I'd leave my sighs and 
But now I am so lonely, I know not where to stay ; My little brother 



S3 



E^F 



S3e 



^=3=m: 



ss 



m 



rH^i 



sobbin', And sweetly I would sing ; And early in each morning I'd fly from tree to 
only Is with nie day by day ; My mother dear was crying When father lay so 



Sills 



^35 



» 



Es£E^ 



S^EE 



i»-i»- 



--?=F&_ 



m 



I 



^ 



=£=**= 



tree; And going and re - turning What pretty things I'd see! 
low; When she her- self was dying— 1 know not what to do. 



3l 



3S£ 



U 



^^T 



ifz^z 



Our parents are in heaven, 

Their spirits went above ; 
Their sins were all forgiven, 

For they the Lord did love : 
God call'd them to forsake us. 

And laid them in the dust ; 
But he himself will take us, 

If in his name we trust. 



If Jesus will receive us 

Within his precious fold ; 
And when he'll please to give us 

Some pretty wings of gold ; 
Then soon we will be flying 

Up to that blessed place, 
Where there is no more crying, 

So near his smiling face. 



THE CLASS ROOM. 
THE PENITENT CHILD. 



69 



i 



3^ 



=t=£. 



*=t 



A long time a - go, when Janett was a child, As thoughtless as 



i 



-it. 



£ 



=p — « 



others, as giddy and wild, She was sent by her mistress one 



■b-*± 



p— f— EE C 



Si 



-H ^ 1 ^ ^ 

evening so fair, Where a fam - i - ly circle were kneeling in prayer. 



Her young heart was then touch'd ; she would afterwards say, 
" O ! that my dear master but knew how to pray ;" 
For she had no father to pray for her soul, 
No mother to counsel, advise, or control. 



One night as the snows drifted deep through the vale, 
While the bleak whistling wind was all dreary and chill, 
She again sought the house where she first heard a prayer, 
And close to the door held her listening ear. 

She heard, as the story of Jesus was read, 
How he suffer'd below, how for sinners he bled ; 
Tears fell from her eyes like the drops of a show'r, 
Till sobbings of anguish were heard at the door. 



That night did the Lord, by his Spirit, impart, 
To the penitent child a conversion of heart ; 
Then happy was she. though an orphan and poor, 
And she never forgot how she knelt at the door. B. 



70 NURSERY SONGS. 

THE HEATHEN MOTHER. 



B: 



j=^ 



J3 



f f r r rTT^rrrfTr 

See that heathen mother stand Where the sacred currents flow, 



^ 



3= 



f f i ii f r tjt I n* r 

With her own ma -,ternal hand 'Mid the waves her infant throw. 

Hark ! I hear the piteous scream, 

Frightful monsters seize their prey : 
Or the dark and bloody stream 

Bears the struggling child away. 

Fainter now, and fainter still, 

Breaks the cry upon the ear ; 
But the mother's heart is steel ; 

She, unmov'd, that cry can hear. 

Send, O send the Bible there, 

Let its precepts reach the heart, 
She may then her children spare — 

Act the mother's tender part. B. 

What is a heathen mother 1 

What is meant by the sacred current ? 

Why does she throw her infant into the river 1 

What monsters of the deep seize infants 1 

Why is the heathen mother so hard-hearted ? 

What would make her love her child 1 

Would the Bible do her good without reading it ? 

What would make its truths touch her heart 1 

Why would she then spare her child 1 



THE CLASS ROOM. 
FRAGILE BLOSSOM. 



71 



i 



3£ 



3^ 



P I s 5 g 



L 

" * > 



55 

Just 



now a 



fragile 



t^^ 



r " > ^ 

blossom grew Up 



=s 



lowly 

*2 



^ 



; f 

stem ; Its 



£ 



^ 



* + * V 

opening leaves dis - closed to view A 



m 



1 



^ 



glitt'ring 



dewy 



gem, 



u E t r i 

glitt'ring dewy gem. 



Jane saw. and gently on her breast, 

The tender flow'ret placed ; 
When lo ! a rude and angry gust 

Its beauties all effaced. 

Its leaves were scattered by the wind, 

Its fragrance lost in air ; 
Till nothing there was left behind 

Of all that was so fair. 

Young children, like this little flower. 

Though beautiful and gay, 
May, in some sudden, mournful hour, 

By death be borne away. 

But the good child who loves to pray, 

Whose sins are all forgiven, 
Who loves the Saviour's will t' obey, 

May live and bloom in heaven. B, 



72 NURSERY SONGS. 

BY THE SIDE OF A RIVER. 



mm^^mmmm 



-Tpp w p m-, -jp w ^r 

By the side of a river so clear. They carried the beautiful 



I 



£ 



33^ 



* 



g 



3^S 



child, Mid the flags and the bushes, In an ark of bulrushes, They 



Ht 



.-* — ~p 



:s=?— "— y— tr-t 



^ 



left him so lonely and wild ; For the ruffians would come, If he 



4±=c 



w?mm 



-P- 



so dear. 



tarried 



at home, And murder that infant 



By the side of the river so clear, 
The ladies were winding their way, 
When Pharaoh's daughter 
Came down to the water, 
Perhaps at the close of the day, 
Before it was dark, 
She opened the ark, 
And found a sweet infant was there. 

By the side of the river so clear, 
That infant was lonely and sad ; 
She took him in pity 
And thought him so pretty, 
And made little Moses so glad ; 
She called him her own — 
Her beautiful son, 
And sent for some nurse that was near. 



THE CLASS ROOM. 73 

Away from the river so clear. 
They carried the beautiful child 
To his own tender mother, 
His sister and brother, 
And then he looked happy and smiled. 
His mother so good, 
Did all that she could 
To nurse him and teach him with care. 
Once more by that river so clear, 
When Moses was aged and good, 
He saw the king tremble, 
Relent, and dissemble, 
And the waters all turning to blood. 
The king would abuse 
And trouble the Jews, 
And turn to the Lord a deaf ear. 
And soon by the sea that was red, 
Stood Moses, the servant of God ; 
While in him he confided, 
The deep was divided, 
As upward he lifted his rod. 
The Jews safely crossed, 
While Pharaoh's host 
Were drowned in the waters and dead. 
And soon on a mountain so high, 

Stood Moses, all trembling with awe, 
Mid the lightnings and thunders, 
And great signs and wonders, 
For God was then giving his law. 
The Lord wrote it down 
On two tables of stone, 
Before he went back to the sky. 
Once more on a mountain he stood, 
The last one he ever might see ; 
The prospect was glorious, 
Where Israel victorious, 
Would soon over Jordan be free. 
Then his labors did cease ; 
He departed in peace, 
And now rests in the heavenly abode. 

Questions and details relating to the history of Moses are very profitable and instructive to 
children. Bible histories, well told, have a powerful influence upon their minds, 



74 



NURSERY SONGS. 
VOICE OF SPRING. 

-> l^i — I s iS i i n. ^ N 




Hark, hark, the voice of spring, Woods and fields with echoes ring, While the birds so 



lEtS 



F=g=^ 



1MML 



-Hr4- 



^-£2- 



-> g r 



i* i* * 



*=* 



-fc-JtL- 






=£=£ 



xn 



2 



■W^LX 



I 



att 



sweetly sing ; Music floats In joyous notes From many a tuneful string. 



3 — m — 



1 



gE3Fr^^ 



±jt 



Hark, hark, the voice of spring ; 
Busy bees are on the wing, 
None but drones are slumbering ; 

Children too 

Should learn to do 
Every useful thing. 

Hark, hark, the voice of spring ; 
From the flowers the breezes bring 
Many a fragrant offering ; 

Emblem true, 

Of incense due 
To Zion's glorious King. 

Hark, hark, the voice of spring ; 
Trees their branches upward fling, 
Vines unto their tendrils cling ; 

Infant bands, 

Lift up your hands, 
Devoutly worshipping. 



ip air ip ff © nj is w m . 



THE ALTAR. 

The music found in the preceding pages may suffice in some measure for training 
and exercising the voices of young children. Care should be taken that the child 
pronounces his words with distinctness and precision. The manner of uttering the 
vowels is that which gives a pleasant or unpleasant tone of voice to the singer. 
Properly speaking, we are never to sing the consonants, but to articulate them 
instantly, much as in speech, though louder and with greater precision. We sing only 
the vowels, and hence our manner of treating them is almost the only circumstance 
that gives sweetness and polish to the voice. 

The music which here follows is not intended for drilling exercises. The little songs 
or hymns are strictly devotional ; and should, as far as practicable, be accompanied 
with devotional associations of thought and feeling. This is a principle of unspeakable 
importance ; and one that ought everywhere to pervade the cultivation of devotional 
so noj. 



NOW 

Soft and slow. 



I LAY ME DOWN. 



BE 



Now I lay me down to sleep, I pray the Lord my soul to keep ; If 



s 



w 



-t=f+- 



-«-. 



^^E£ 



^E 



fe 



m 



-?—?*-!* 



1 r; — r~ 

I wake, I 



I should die be- fore 



pray the Lord my soul to take. 



S 



ee 



± 



:£=£ 



IN THE MORNING. 
Through the night with slumber press'd, 
The Lord hath giv'n me quiet rest ; 
Let mercy guide me through the day, 
And lead me in the narrow way. 



AT NIGHT. 
Now I lay me down to sleep, 
I pray the Lord my soul to keep ; 
If I should die before I wake, 
I pray the Lord my soul to take. Watts. 



76 



NURSERY SONGS. 
THE SUN HATH GONE TO REST. 



m^^ ^^m 



*t 



-*— * 



~g «~» 



The sun hath gone to rest, The bee forsakes the flower, 



pppi 



s 



5 



?§33±S 



iiF^N¥^^gP8 



H 



/ 



The young bird slumbers in its nest, Within the leafy bower. 



£feftB Eg 



33ESE53E5 



W 9 & 



The sun hath gone to rest, 

The bee forsakes the flower, 
The young bird slumbers in its nest, 

Within the leafy bower. 

Where have I been this day 1 

Into what folly run 1 
Forgive me, Father, when I pray, 

Through Jesus Christ thy son. 

When all my days are o'er, 

And in the grave I lie ; 
Wilt thou permit my soul to soar 

To worlds beyond the sky. L. H. S. 



THE ALTAR. 



77 



\ 



DARK NIGHT AWAY. 

First Treble. 



I 



^z 



m*¥±=£=te s 



st 



Dark night a - way hath rolled, Glad birds are soaring high, The 
Second Treble. 



H 



£ 






-•— * *—\-9- 



r* — — jj- 

Dark night a - way hath rolled, Glad birds are soaring high, The 



Base. 












m • - C 










|VL- ff O m * 


— # — 


-f f r 






__* — 


\ * R ' 






1 • fl 


• 


i • 


*- 


+ 


* 



«H» i o 


jr 1 


i — * * — a a — 


«* « 1 




/ s= • * 


• 




* 


# * 1 it 


n i 


#• 


* %~ * 1 


Iv ^ 






^x r 1 II 


sun with rays 

n - 


of gold Looks from the dazzling 


sky. 




i x i 




" V ^*- 




2 


/ s? r ■ 


rs 






1 


1 


fin i * 




* * 13 « 




. s 


tnl ^ # • 


j 


#• •'. 


• m * 


#. * 


i 


sun with ravs 


of gold Looks from the dazzling 


sky. 




efc-jt r ■ i 




















! 


f * ' ' 


r P 


1 ! > 1 




1 


v 


» 




& * e + 







Dark night away hath roll'd. 

Glad birds are soaring high, 
The sun with rays of gold 

Looks from the dazzling sky. 

Teach me to thank the Power, 
Whose hand sustains me so ; 

Who o'er each fragrant flower. 
Bids dews of mercy flow. 

O raise my heart above, 
Where angel hosts adore ; 

I'll praise thee for thy love, 
And count thv mercies o'er. 



L. H. S. 



78 



NURSERY SONGS. 
THE TEMPEST. 



£* 



ss 



rap 



h^A 



f 



3-^S 



r ft f 



IS-* 
-•-* 



£££ 



SE 



TOT 



I- 



The night is dark, the wind is high, And rain is pouring from the sky, 

^-4- , K'T i s i : ~~'rth 



fe 



There is no moon, the stars are gone, The lamps are out, the fire is down. 

But there is one who dwells above, 

Whose looks are bright, whose name is love, 

His guardian care 

Is everywhere, 
And those who love him need not fear. 

Such was the night in Galilee, 
When the disciples on the sea, 

Far from the coast, 

By tempest tost, 
Expected to be sunk and lost. 

The Lord rebuk'd the angry seas, 

And hush'd the winds and waves to peace ; 

He spake the word, 

The tempest heard, 
And own'd the power of Christ the Lord. 

Then let the rain in torrents pour, 
And let the winds in tumult roar ; 

Dark be the night, 

Yet Christ my light 
Around me shines in splendor bright. 



THE ALTAR. 
AWARE, AWAKE, 3IY LOVE.* 



79 




Awake, awake, my love, 
Our Father from a - bove, Would lend his gracious ear To 



P^te j^ji^ 



^ffig 



=2 4- 



§ 



•&-**■ 



S 



f±±L 



g^^ gg 



»= 



listen to your prayer, Rise and unbosom every care. 



a 



-> i * |V- 



j ^^3 



?i^E§j 



I » » £- 



Awake, awake, my love, 
Our Father from above, 
Would lend his gracious ear 
To listen to your prayer ; 
Rise and unbosom every care. 

Awake, awake, my love, 
Our Father from above, 
In accents kind and mild, 
Would own you as his child, 
Though you're by nature all defiled. 

Awake, awake, my love, 
The Saviour from above 
Can pardon all your sin, 
And bid your soul be clean ; 
His blood can cleanse from every stain. 



H. S. M. 



• The earliest murning thoughts of children should have reference to God's preserving care, &c 



80 NURSERY SONGS. 

AND NOW THE DAY IS ENDING. 



§5 



~^m 



And now the day is end - ing, With all its toil and 



3 T 



£ 



£ 



ft 



£i 



care, My voice to heaven as - cending, Shall of - fer praise and 



E£S 



SE 



+-p- 



prayer : The Lord is 



mindful Of those who seek his 



Bi 



^— f— ^- 



l 

-*i=j J- 



face ; And children weak and sinful, May feel his saving grace. 

EVENING. 

And now the day is ending, For all my sin and folly, 

With all its toil and care, This day from morn to ev'n, 

My voice to heaven ascending, I pray the Lord most holy, 

Shall offer praise and prayer : That I may be forgiv'n. 

The Lord is ever mindful His bleeding love so precious, 

Of those who seek his face ; I now recall to mind : 

And children weak and sinful, The Lord is ever gracious, 

May feel his saving grace. And pitiful and kind. 

While I, my sins confessing, 

Implore his pard'ning love : 
I'll praise him for each blessing 

Descending from above ; 
Ingratitude, so hateful — 

O ! keep me from that sin ; 
Lord, make me truly grateful, 

And cleanse my soul within. 



THE ALTAR. 
HAPPY CHILD. 



81 



m 



s 



£ 



=F-»- 



Happy, happy child am I, ) 



^ 



s 



On a mother's arms to lie, ) On a soft and downy bed 



Or to rest my weary head ) 

•J 



Be- 



w^m ^^^ m^m^m^ 



^s 



I 



g& 



5j + * -*a 



"»~»~ 



WT ^ ; ^— ^j j *"—— 

neath her gentle eye, While she kneels beside me there, Teaching me a holy prayer. 



eff 



P 



i 



3^?§ 



W=3-Jtj- 



*=*=+ 



But the little heathen child, 
Naked, ignorant, and wild, 
Has no home or downy bed 
Where to rest his aching head, 

Or mother's arms to shield. 
She no prayer of love can say ; 
Heathen mothers will not pray. 



Blessed Saviour, now I see, 
Thou art kinder far to me, 
And I will not lay my head, 
On my downy peaceful bed, 

Till I have prayed to thee ; 
Thanked thee for a mother's care, 
►Such as heathen never share. B. 

6* 



82 



NURSERY SONGS. 



THE STORM. 



£ 



1 



**z 



How fierce the lightning blazes ! I hear the thunders roar : Hark ! how the wind a- 



H 



B£ 



£ 



**- 



£=s: 



rises ! While clouds their waters pour : But in the Lord con - fi - ding, Our 



& 



s 



:Q~2Ip: 



£ 



F^F 



■-*- 



u 



souls feel no alarm ; For he himself is ri - ding Up - on the angry 



-^m^^B^m^m ^-trtrm 



storm : For he himself 



ri-ding Up - on the angry storm. 



The lightnings are his arrows, 

The thunders are his voice, 
Yet e'en the feeblest sparrows 

May safe in him rejoice ; 
The clouds and winds and waters 

Obey his sovereign word ; 
Let Zion's sons and daughters 

Adore th' Almighty Lord. 

When lightnings red are streaking, 

A Father's arm is bared ; 
When thunders loud are speaking, 

A Father's voice is heard : 
The foes that flee before him 

Can never feel his grace ; 
While children that adore him 

Shall see his smiling face. 



THE ALTAR, 



83 



LORD'S PRAYER. 

First Treble. 




Uf- 



zCfcr 



=£*: 



-4-+* 



Our Father, our Father in heaven, Be hallowed thy glorious name ; 
Second Treble. 



SS 



Our Father, our Father in heaven, Be hallowed thy glorious name: 



9 i i 


I 9- 


1 97?- 


r^ 








A I \ \ P 


& i r 


CD ' * 


! i m 


r 9 r~ 


o 




ff n m \ A T 


J v> 


>^ 




i 


1 B 


\K\\ 9 \ & 








L.I 






%f 9 . > * 

To thee let the kingdom be given, Thy will we acknowledge supreme. 


V 




r* 


9 - 


9 




| 


/ 




1 ! 


i ) 


i «.r 


& 1 1 fe 1 


1 


n 9 


rcfl 




! > ' 


1 i J ■ 


i i <* 


1 1 J J 


1 


^ a 


^7 a 




J i ^ 


l 3,0 


— i .-<* 


J 1 9* J 4 




2 


To thee let the kingdom be given, Thy will we acknowledge supreme. 


Ct I 








1 






®. 9 e 


1 




Isi- i 








J J 


i i 


i ! i 


r i 


1 


It 


p 


6 


i 


d> 


9 9 9 


CD 




i ^ i 


. CD 


I 



















THE LORD'S PRAYER. 

Our Father, our Father in heaven, 

Be hallowed thy glorious name j 
To thee let the kingdom be given, 

Thy will we acknowledge supreme. 
We would by thy bounty be fed, 

By infinite mercy forgiv'n : 
Nor into temptation be led, 

Or into sad evils be driv'n. 
For thine is the kingdom, O Lord, 

The power and the glory are thine, 
Be forever and ever adored 

On earth as in heaven divine. 



84 NURSERY SONGS. 

SELF-CONSECRATION. 



ii 



^ 



^E#fefef 



i h 



O, Jesus, delight of my soul, My Saviour, my Shepherd di- 



m 



^m 



s£ 



-F--i 



^ 



-&=■ 



vine, I yield to thy blessed control ; My body and spirit are 




n 



s 



: FE35 



3S: 



— i — m^— 

thine; Thy love I can never deserve, That bids me be happy in 



3 



illll 



irC=C 



thee ; My God and my King I will serve, Whose favor is heaven to me. 



SELF-CONSECRATION. 

O, Jesus, delight of my soul, 

My Saviour, my Shepherd divine, 
I yield to thy blessed control ; 

My body and spirit are thine ; 
Thy love I can never deserve, 

That bids me be happy in thee, 
My God and my King I will serve ; 

Whose favor is heaven to me. 

How can I thy goodness repay, 

By nature so weak and denied ? 
Myself I have given away ; 

O call me thine own little child : 
And art thou my Father above 1 

Will Jesus abide in my heart ? 
O bind me so fast with thy love, 

That I nevrr from tlioe shall depart. 



THE ALTAR. 



85 



THE LILIES. 



O L ^ 


, r , 


r n r* ^ ^ 


I 1 




^,-l> c - 


\ \ s 


— i 1 « eue—i—j J—i 


— __1=E 


mm* 


—0 

— # e 0- 


— h=^i — * — 9 — 

' 0» *' P _ " "^ 


f— 0—0 0-t 


The 
E* h fi m 


i * i £ 
lilies, how they 


\ 


0. iff f 

grow, They neither toil nor 


0» 

! 1 

spin : ' 

-+— H 


r 

fet 


" bS „ 


\\. u I — v 


\r- ° ' 1 k 


—0. 


M 



§§j 



^^ ^ 



3^£ 



rr 






kings, with all their glittering show, Are not arrayed like them. 



ltfc 



±Jc 



If God so clothe the grass, 

That lives but for a day, 
O how much more will he clothe us ? 

Then cast your fears away. 

The birds that wing the air 

Do neither sow nor reap, 
And neither house nor barn prepare, 

Yet God provides them meat. 



Our value far exceeds 

The sparrows, in his view : 
If his kind hand supplies their needs, 

Then he will feed us too. My LUlk Hymn Book. 



NURSERY SONGS. 
" I'M NOT TOO YOUNG." L. M. 



^1-3- 



e^ 



P 



p— ¥=£+ 



i 



4 — 4 — o-A-m- 



I'm not too young for God to see; He knows my name and nature too, And 



J & r r 



3 






^M 



te^ 



rP= 



£ 



feS^ 



s 



all day long he looks at me, And sees my actions through and through. 



-fr- j 



m 



sees 



5 



5=5 



"ST 1^1 "^ 



I'm not too young for God to see ; 

He knows my name and nature too ; 
And all day long he looks at me, 

And sees my actions through and through. 

He listens to the words I say ; 

He knows the thoughts I have within ; 
And whether I'm at work or play. 

He 's sure to see it, if I sin. 

If some good minister is near, 

It makes us careful what we do : 
And how much more we ought to fear 

The Lord, who sees us through and through. 

Thus when I want to do amiss, 

However pleasant it may be, 
I'll always try to think of this, 

I'm not too young for God to see. 



My Little Hymn Book. 



THE ALTAR. 



87 



TENDER SHEPHERD. 

Mot too quick. 




Jesus, tender Shepherd, hear me ! Bless thy little lambs to-night ! 



I 






I* IS 



fe 



£g 



m 



Through the darkness be thou near me, Watch my sleep till morning light. 



Jesus, tender Shepherd, hear me ! 

Bless thy little lambs to-night ! 
Through the darkness be thou near me, 

Watch my sleep till morning light. 



All this day thy hand has led me, 
And I thank thee for thy care ; 

Thou hast clothed me, warmed and fed me, 
Listen to my evening prayer. 



Let my sins be all forgiven ; 

Bless the friends I love so well ; 
Take me, when I die, to heaven, 

Happy there with thee to dwell. 



Mrs. M. L. D. 



88 NURSERY SONGS. 

THE MORNING. 






How beauteous the morning appears, The woodlands their songs have begun ; The 



^#*«^« 

U V 



dew-drops, Uke pen - i - tent tears, Are bright in the beams of the sun. 



How beauteous the morning appears, 
The woodlands their songs have begun. 

The dew-drops, like penitent tears, 
Are bright in the beams of the sun. 

The landscape is verdant and gay, 
The meadows in richness are clad, 

The flocks and the herds are at play, 
And the heart of the peasant is glad. 

How gently the waterfall pours, 

How softly the breezes arise, 
How fragrant the opening flowers 

Which spring in her beauty supplies ! 

All nature is smiling in peace, 

The goodness of God she displays ; 

As mercies around us increase, 
Let us join in the anthems of praise. H. 



THE ALTAR. 
LET CHILDREN YOUNG. 



89 






^_^ 



SB 



n*— *- 



m 



p 



-*-9~ 



I 



t t 



f 



L 



U If U l* " b< Ik U > " K 

Let children young With joyful tongue Lift up the notes of praise ; 



I 



£=&= 



S=g 



3^ 



* d* 



I llll II I I I I Z I 

To Christ the Lord, In heaven adored, Their glad ho - san - nas 



i 







raise, ho - san- nas, ho - sannas, Their glad ho- sannas raise. 



He bids thee come, 

Nor longer roam 
Where youthful folly lies; 

But seek his love 

Who dwells above, 
Where high hosannas rise. 

Hosannas, &c. 



They who believe 

Shall grace receive, 
And in his presence dwell ; 

They'll sing in heaven 

Of sins forgiven, 
And loud hosannas swell. 

Hosannas, &c. 



Ye children now 

To Jesus bow, 
Your Saviour and your King ; 

Seek here below 

His love to know, 
And loud hosannas sin^. Hosannas, 



&c. 



90 



NURSERY SONGS. 
LUCERNE. C. M. D. 



Air by Rev. C. H. 




Now condescend, Al - mighty King, To bless the little throng, 
And kindly listen while we sing Our pleasant evening song. 






^S=^tt =^^^^ 



D. C. For this our feeble voices join ; To God we give the praise. 



j-j- 



3=4= — S— -I— 



-4B ^— 



J I I I I 



IEEE 



I ' II ' ' I • D.C. 

We come to thank the Pow'r divine, That watches o'er our days, 



3 



1=1 



m 



Now condescend, Almighty King, 

To bless the little throng, 
And kindly listen while we sing 

Our pleasant evening song. 
We come to thank the Pow'r divine, 

That watches o'er our days, 
For this our feeble voices join ; 

To God we give the praise. 
May we in safety sleep to-night, 

From every danger free, 
For, Lord, the darkness and the light 

Are both alike to thee. 
And when the rising sun displays 

His cheering beams abroad, 
Then may our grateful morning lays 

Declare the love of God, Anon. 



ADOPTION. 



uUfc 



BES^Q 



THE ALTAR. 

E» 



91 



5£ 



^=t 



■m — » — m — % — m—f—^—^—9 — f — f ' # f * 

u t u . P u ^ ' '^ L t u u f I 

My God, who made each shining star To throw its twinkling beams so far, In 



St: 



^ 



1 



F 



VT 



.~~iL 



J 

I 



F p W~ 



rTTTT 



mercy gently conde - scend To be my Father and my Friend. 



ag- fe— ^hf -N-f 



at*: 



My God, who made each shining star 
To throw its twinkling beams so far, 
In mercy' gently condescend 
To be my Father and my Friend. 

Art thou my Father 1 let me be 
A meek, obedient child to thee ; 
And try in word and deed and thought 
To serve and please thee as I ought. 

Art thou my Father 1 I'll depend 
Upon the care of such a Friend, 
And only wish to do and be 
Whatever seemeth good to thee 

Art thou my Father 1 Then at last 

When all my days on earth are pass'd, 

Send down and take me, in thy love, 

To be thy better child above. . My Little Hymn Book. 



92 



NURSERY SONGS. 



HOSANNA. 



i^^g^^g^^ 



aa 



Ho - sannas were by children sung, When Jesus was on earth ; 
Then surely we are not too young To sound his praises forth ; 



i 



s^ 



^=f- 



^=^ 



The Lord is great, the Lord is good ; He feeds us from his store With 



% 



PP=3=£ 



i 



earthly and with heav'nly food ; We'll praise him ev - er - more. 



And when to him young children came, 

He took them in his arms ; 
He blessed them in his Father's name, 

And spoke with heav'nly charms : 
We thank him for his gracious word, 

We thank him for his love ; 
We'll sing the praises of our Lord, 

Who reigns in heaven above. 



Before he left this world of woe, 

On Calvary he died ; 
His blood for us did freely flow 

Forth from his wounded side : 
O, then we'll magnify his name, 

Who groaned and died for us ; 
We'll worship the atoning Lamb, 

And kneel before his cross. 



He rose again and walked abroad, 

And many saw his face : 
They called him th' incarnate God, 

Redeemer of our race : 
He rose and he ascended high, 

We'll bow to his command ; 
His glories fill the earth and sky, 

He sits at God's right hand. 



H&l 



MIDDLETOWN. 

N 



THE ALTAR. 
CM. 



93 



mmm 



jC 



How sweet and heav'nly is the sight, When those that fear the Lord, 



i 



P^H^g 



i 



^ 



? 



- 



In mutual love and peace u - nite, And thus ful - fil his word. 



How sweet and heav'nly is the sight, 
When those that fear the Lord, 

In mutual love and peace unite, 
And thus fulfil his word. 



When each can feel his brother's sigh, 
And with him bear a part ; 

When sorrow flows from eye to eye, 
And joy from heart to heart. 



When love in one delightful stream, 
Through every bosom flows ; 

And union sweet and fond esteem 
In ev'ry action glows. 



Love is the golden chain that binds 

The happy souls above, 
And he's an heir of heaven that finds 

His bosom filled with love. 



94 NURSERY SONGS. 

BARON. S. M. 

J N_J IS U J 



=£ 



£e± 



W. B. B. 



S 



Est 



=s=s= 



Ifr-I"- 



=P= 



:s F 






TT I tr r— it . „ 

How sweet to bless the Lord, And in his praises join ; 



# § « d g 4 * a- 



j 



Wu 



^rr=^ 



^FF?tpp 



With saints his goodness to record, And sing his pow'r di - vine, With 



#- 



r 



^=feJ 



gEE3EEEEEj3EEEj 



H 



-t 



p= 



saints his goodness to record, And sing his pow'r di - - vine. 



F^R 



How sweet to bless the Lord, 
And in his praises join ; 

With saints his goodness to record, 
And sing his pow'r divine. 



These seasons of delight 
The dawn of glory seem, 

Like rays of pure celestial light 
Which on our spirits beam. 



THE ALTAR, 



95 



HOW GENTLE. 

First Treble. 



3^ 



SPS^ 



# 4- 



• »~ 



How gentle God's commands, How kind his precepts are ; 



Second Treble, 
s_#_^ 



fs is i- 



~* fr_ 



m 



n u # * 














v - * 


p 


• 1 


1 * 






/ # # r i 






\ \ \ m 


1 


1 


n « * 


r y- r r 


r *• r m 


• jd 1 r 


d 


J 


l 1 /! # 


1^11 




• # 






*' IT 1 1 ^ - 1 ' 

Come, cast your burdens on the Lord, And trust his constant care. 


J ■. - _* 


^ !S ! 


?* ** 








A # * ^H 


1 1 i 


iii 


r 


SI 


1 


I 


n ! i i 




m a a 


j 


1 I 


1 


1 


^ ^- JL - 


1 


* * * +- 


-* — « 


L_W— J- 


-o- 





How gentle God's commands, 
How kind his precepts are ; 

Come, cast your burdens on the Lord, 
And trust his constant care. 



His goodness stands approved 
Down to the present day ; 

I'll drop my burden at his feet, 
And bear a song away. 



96 



NURSERY SONGS. 
WELCOME, WELCOME. 7s 



— — h- i \— f — & S P ds « — a f — 3 — r — P 



SE5 



Welcome, welcome, day of rest, 

= <L^ — Jl 



IT 



rr 

To the world in kindness giv'n, 



B & 



S-W— d- 



^F¥ 



-p— f- 



: FTf=F 




I — r 



S3 



3^B 



1 



S 



P 



]iSH 



P=h=P 



sps; 



•rrrr rr 



M 



i n 

Welcome to this care-worn breast, As the beaming light from heav'n. 

■^■eL | I I I I I I J. 



&E 



J!_J. 



Ji 



ZS , g" 



wm 



±Jsz 



~g? 



f= 



T 



Day of soft and sweet repose, 
Gently now thy moments run, 

As the peaceful streamlet flows 
Radiant with a summer's sun. 

Day of tidings from the skies, 
Day of solemn praise and prayer, 

Day to make the simple wise, 
O how great thy blessings are f 

Welcome, welcome, day of rest, 
With thy influ'nce all divine ; 

May thy hallowed hours be blest 
To this feeble heart of mine.